Chuck Schumer calls on Pence, demands ‘quickest and most effective way’ to remove Trump

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Soon-to-be Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer issued a statement Thursday blaming President Donald Trump for the storming of the U.S. Capitol and calling on both his Cabinet and Vice President Mike Pence to remove him from office via the 25th Amendment.

Schumer also threatened to “impeach the president” if Trump isn’t “immediately” removed from office.

What happened at the U.S. Capitol yesterday was an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president. This president should not hold office one day longer,” the Democrat lawmaker said.

The quickest and most effective way — it can be done today — to remove this president from office would be for the vice president to immediately invoke the 25th Amendment. If the vice president and the Cabinet refuse to stand up, Congress should reconvene to impeach the president.”

Whether or not the president’s Cabinet will abide by this growing request remains unknown, though according to the media’s anonymous sources, officials from the highest level of the White House are indeed considering removing him.

Talks of invoking the 25th first emerged via CBS News’s Margaret Brennan.

“This is not news that we deliver lightly, and I want to make clear that what I am explaining here is what is being discussed, whispered about among some Cabinet members today — and that is whether to move forward with formal proceedings to try to invoke the 25th Amendment,” she announced Wednesday evening.

“That would allow for the removal of President Trump from office and for Vice President Mike Pence to effectively become commander in chief for the remaining days of the Trump presidency. My sources are telling me it has not been formally presented to the vice president. This is not about to happen. It is, however, being discussed right now.”

In an update published Thursday afternoon, The Washington Post confirmed that the talks were ongoing.

“Fearful that Trump could take actions resulting in further violence and death if he remains in office even for a few days, senior administration officials were discussing Wednesday night whether the Cabinet might invoke the 25th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution to force him out, said a person involved in the conversations,” the outlet reported.

“A former senior administration official briefed on the talks confirmed that preliminary discussions of the 25th Amendment were underway, although this person cautioned that they were informal and that there was no indication of an immediate plan of action. Both of these people, like some others interviewed for this story, spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the matter.”

According to the Post, the president spent Wednesday night “raging” against the growing number of people who he believes have “betrayed” him.

As of Thursday afternoon, the list had grown to encompass not only former House Speaker Newt Gingrich but even former Attorney General Bill Barr.

As well as Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf.

“These violent actions are unconscionable, and I implore the President and all elected officials to strongly condemn the violence that took place yesterday,” Wolf said in a statement Thursday.

“DHS takes the safety and security of all Americans very seriously — it’s at the core of our mission to defend our homeland. Any appearance of inciting violence by an elected official goes against who we are as Americans.”

Shortly after he made the statement, the media began claiming that Wolf’s nomination to be made the permanent head of DHS had been withdrawn by Trump in retaliation.

However, the White House disputed this narrative.

“The withdrawal occurred yesterday and was not related at all to Wednesday’s events or the Acting Secretary’s comments this morning. Acting Secretary Wolf remains the acting secretary and continues to perform the duties of his office,”  White House spokesman Judd Deere reportedly said.

Meanwhile, a number of top White House officials have resigned from their post, while others are reportedly considering their own resignations.

“A trio of senior White House aides — national security adviser Robert C. O’Brien, deputy national security adviser Matthew Pottinger and deputy chief of staff Chris Liddell — were contemplating resigning, according to three senior administration officials,” the Post reported.

“Two of first lady Melania Trump’s top aides abruptly resigned Wednesday night in what one close adviser to the president interpreted as a sign of their disapproval of Wednesday’s events. … In addition, deputy White House press secretary Sarah Matthews announced her resignation, saying she was honored to serve the Trump administration but ‘deeply disturbed’ by the storming of the Capitol.”

Vivek Saxena

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