French wine exporters upset with new U.S. tariffs, but freedom-loving Americans have better options

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A federation of French wine exporters is complaining that U.S. tariffs on wine and cognac are costing their industry $1.2 billion annually, but fortunately for liberty-minded Americans, there is a much better domestic option.

On Wednesday, U.S. trade officials announced an increase in tariffs on specific products exported from the European Union which included wines, cognacs, non-sparkling vino, and brandies from France and Germany, the New York Post reported.

The announcement from the Office of the U.S. Trade, Representative, which also said aircraft manufacturing parts would be affected, did not say when the tariffs would be implemented.

However, the increased duties stem from a long-running disagreement between the EU and the U.S. regarding the subsidizing of the European aircraft maker Airbus SE versus its American rival, Boeing.

In 2019, the Trump administration imposed tariffs that were approved by the World Trade Organization that amounted to roughly $7.5 billion on imports from the United Kingdom and the EU. The duties included a 25-percent tax on French wine, the Post reported.

In response, the EU imposed WTO-approved tariffs on about $4 million worth of U.S. imports in November.

“This is a real sledgehammer blow in a fight which has nothing to do with us,” Cesar Giron, head of the Federation of Wine and Spirits Exporters told Reuters.

“The overall impact will be over one billion euros for the entire wine and spirits sector,” he added.

The new tariffs on French and German spirits are likely to upset American restaurants that feature them on their wine lists and menus. U.S. restaurant owners urged Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden to pledge to lift the tariffs if he takes office later this month.

The Coalition to Stop Restaurant Tariffs, which represents eateries around the country, said that peeling back duties would be beneficial to restaurants that have seen their income greatly reduced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

But fortunately for Americans — especially those who are recommitting to supporting patriotic brands — there is an affordable option.

We The People, which is featured at BizPac Review, is an emerging iconic American brand whose founders have pledged to support conservative principles.

“American exceptionalism, free markets, religious freedom and limited government are what we stand for,” the company says on its website.

While many other U.S. corporations jump on board to support the latest ‘woke’ leftist trend, We The People remains unique in the winemaker’s unabashed support for conservatism, noting that “a portion of the proceeds from each bottle sold will go directly towards supporting candidates and causes that reflect the values our community stands for.”

And the best part: No import duties.

In addition to American corporations, sports leagues — especially last year amid a resurgent Black Lives Matter movement — also embraced leftist causes that espouse, among other issues, socialist economic principles such as wealth redistribution and dangerous public policies such as defunding police departments and decriminalizing behaviors that experts say increases serious crimes and puts entire communities at risk.

As such, We The People chose instead to focus on a more unifying message of placing emphasis on traditional American principles and values.

“We have hand-crafted our premium California wine to reflect our American values,” the company says.

As for the wines themselves, the company says, “We emphasize the wine’s fruit and acidity rather than alcohol and tannins, achieving elegance and balance for the perfect finish. Our California wine pairs well with a broad range of palates making it the perfect table wine.”

The company currently offers a dark Cabernet Savignon and a light Chardonnay, both of which are made in the Golden State’s fertile, award-winning Wine Country.

Jon Dougherty

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