‘Bush v. Gore is precedent here’: Trump team asks Supreme Court to review Wisconsin voter fraud case

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President Donald Trump’s campaign legal team filed a petition to the U.S. Supreme Court asking for a review of a Wisconsin election fraud case.

Lawyers for Trump’s reelection campaign challenged the voting results in the state and, on Tuesday, asked the high court to review the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s decision to dismiss the case involving about 50,000 absentee ballots, Fox News reported. The president’s team is looking for the Supreme Court to expedite the review before Congress meets on January 6 to certify the Electoral College votes.

Trump’s senior legal advisor Jenna Ellis told Newsmax that the Wisconsin case is similar to former President George W. Bush’s case on the Florida voting results in the 2000 election.

Ellis accused the Supreme Court of a “dereliction of duty” in refusing to hear previous cases the campaign petitioned and told host Grant Stinchfield on Tuesday that the team will continue the legal fight “because we care about election integrity” and will keep pushing cases through.

(Source: Newsmax TV)

“If this election and all of the fraud is not corrected by January 6th, this will have been a failure not of the Trump legal team, not of the failure of evidence of the Supreme Court, the Judicial branch, the entire way down. And, Grant it will have mainly been a failure of the state legislatures,” Ellis said.

“Bush v. Gore is precedent here on electoral challenges and they need to recognize that President Trump absolutely gets the same opportunity to argue his case that President George W. Bush did in 2000,” Ellis added.  “And to treat him differently than every other sitting president and every other election is manifestly interfering in the due process in our constitution.”

More than 20,000 votes gave Democrat nominee Joe Biden the victory in Wisconsin over Trump and his campaign then challenged the irregularities in the use of absentee ballots in the state. But the Wisconsin Supreme Court voted 4-3 to dismiss the lawsuit, with conservative Justice Brian Hagedorn siding with three liberal justices against Trump, ruling that the case was filed too late and did not have merit.

A petition for a Writ of Certiorari was filed by Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani asking the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the state court’s decision, which effectively “allowed over 50,000 illegal absentee ballots in violation of Article II of the U.S. Constitution and Wisconsin law.”

“Regrettably, the Wisconsin Supreme Court, in their 4-3 decision, refused to address the merits of our claim,” campaign attorney Jim Troupis said in a statement.

“This ‘Cert Petition’ asks them to address our claims, which, if allowed, would change the outcome of the election in Wisconsin,” Troupis added. “Three members of the Wisconsin State Supreme Court, including the Chief Justice, agreed with many of the President’s claims in written dissents from that court’s December 14 order.”

The petition to the high court noted the campaign’s allegations of wrongdoing, including the counting of more than 28,000 votes from people “who failed to provide identification by abusing the state’s ‘indefinitely confined status.’”

Two previous challenges to the election have been rejected by the Supreme Court which has refused to even hear the cases.

Rep. Mo Brooks is one of several House members who plan to object to the Electoral College vote on Jan. 6.

“There are dozens in the House of Representatives who have reached that conclusion that I have; we’re going to sponsor and co-sponsor objections to the Electoral College vote returns,” the Alabama Republican told Fox News on Monday.

“A lot of time is being wasted in court … the Supreme Court does not have the lawful authority to determine whether to accept or reject a state’s Electoral College submissions,” Brooks said during a speech on the House floor earlier this month.

“Under the United States Constitution and U.S. law, that is the job and duty of elected officials,” he added. “And so it’s the United States Congress that is the final judge and jury of whether to accept or reject Electoral College submissions by states and to elect who the president and vice president of the United States might be.”

Frieda Powers

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