Neighbor says Nashville bomber made a chilling remark ahead of Christmas Day explosion

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The man responsible for the Christmas Day bombing in Nashville had reportedly made a remark to a neighbor that was chilling in hindsight.

Anthony Quinn Warner made some major changes to his life in the days leading up to Christmas when he detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville, dying in the blast that wreaked devastation for blocks. The 63-year-old had apparently planned to not survive the bombing and had told a neighbor just days before that the city and the world were “never going to forget” him.

Warner signed over the ownership of his Nashville home to a California woman a month before the bombing. He also reportedly told his former girlfriend that he had cancer and gave her his car weeks ago. The freelance IT contractor had said he was retiring and he appeared to be getting his affairs in order before the apparent suicide bombing on the early morning hours of Christmas.

As investigators continue to search for more information and a motive behind the bombing, one of Warner’s neighbors saw a comment he made just days before his death in a new light.


(Source: Fox News)

Rick Laude recalled that he saw Warner standing at his mailbox while he was driving on December 21. He told The Associated Press on Monday that he pulled over to speak with him, asking how Warner’s elderly mother was doing.

“Is Santa going to bring you anything good for Christmas?” Laude, a 57-year-old commercial truck driver, said he casually asked.

He recalled that Warner smiled as he replied, “Oh, yeah, Nashville and the world is never going to forget me.”

Laude told the AP that he didn’t think much of the remark at the time, considering that Warner had meant that “something good” was going to happen for him financially. The outlet reported that Laude was “speechless” after learning that Warner had been identified as the bomber.

“Nothing about this guy raised any red flags,” Laude said. “He was just quiet.”

Warner, who had one prior arrest for a 1978 marijuana-related charge, had reportedly not been on the radar of authorities who are still trying to gather information.

“We hope to get an answer. Sometimes, it’s just not possible,” David Rausch, the director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said on NBC’s “Today” show on Monday. “The best way to find a motive is to talk to the individual. We will not be able to do that in this case.”

“It does appear that the intent was more destruction than death, but again that’s all still speculation at this point as we continue in our investigation with all our partners,” Rausch said.

Body camera video was released on Monday by Nashville police.

**WARNING: Disturbing Content**

According to the Associated Press:

The recording from Officer Michael Sipos’ camera captures officers walking past the RV parked across the street as the recorded warning blares and then helping people evacuate after the thunderous blast off camera. Car alarms and sirens wail as a police dispatch voice calls for all available personnel and people stumble through downtown streets littered with glass.

 

DNA found at the explosion site as well as recovered parts from the RV helped to identify Warner.

Frieda Powers

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