Single mother, 29, given free homes by suspected ‘Nashville bomber,’ FBI zeroes in on leads

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On Saturday federal authorities identified a “person of interest” in the Nashville Christmas morning bombing case and proceeded to search a home in Antioch, Tennessee, where his RV had been spotted parked within the past two weeks.

As of Sunday morning, the findings from the search still remained unknown, but the name of the possible suspect, Anthony Quinn Warner, had been released, as had the name of the woman who apparently unknowingly owned the home, Michelle Swing.

According to reports, Warner had owned the $160,000 home up until Nov. 25th, when he abruptly transferred it into Swing’s name via a “quit claim” for $0, allegedly without telling her of the transfer, which explains why her signature isn’t on it.

“In the state of Tennessee, you can deed property to someone else without their consent or their signature or anything. I didn’t even buy the house. He just deeded it over to me without my knowledge. So this is all very weird to me, that’s about all I can say,” Swing said in a statement to the Daily Mail.

The home was one of two that had been given to her by Warner, the Daily Mail reported. In January of 2019, Warner transferred another Antioch home — this one worth $249,000 — to her via a quit claim, and again for $0. She in turn transferred it to another person, Betty Lane, Warner’s mother.  This transaction was more complicated, and involved a lawsuit, according to early reports:

Lane says in her lawsuit that Anthony, acting as ‘attorney-in-fact’ fraudulently claimed the $250,000 home for himself in an August 2018 quitclaim deed transfer.

Lifelong bachelor Anthony then mysteriously gave the home to a 29-year-old, Los Angeles-based woman named Michelle Swing, whose ties to him are unclear.

The mother-son suit appeared to have been resolved by November of this year, however, after Swing used the same transfer process to give the three-bed, single story property back to Lane, who is still residing there today.

Swing’s relationship to Warner is unknown in part because she “declined to say whether she had ever met Warner or whether she had family links to him,” according to the Daily Mail.

All that’s known is that Swing’s an unmarried 29-year-old mother who lives in California but apparently grew up in Tennessee.

“She attended Knoxville Catholic High School between 2005 and 2008 and went to the College of Business Administration of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville between 2008 and 2012 where she earned her bachelor’s degree in marketing and international business,” the International Business Times has confirmed.

The authorities zeroed in specifically on the $160,000 Antioch home on 115 Bakerstown Road because an RV “similar” to the one seen at the Nashville bombing had been spotted there within the past few weeks.

Images from Google Maps show the RV parked outside the home as early as May 2019.

Federal authorities are reportedly sifting through at least 500 leads, though Warner appears to be the primary suspect in part because of his RV, in part because of the bizarre home transfers and in part because of his alleged paranoia.

“Realtor Steve Fridrich contacted the FBI after reading Warner’s name, as for several years, a man by the name of Tony Warner had worked for him for several years doing information technology work,” Nashville station WSMV reported Saturday.

“Fridrich confirms that agents asked him whether or not Warner had paranoia about 5G technology. Fridrich told the agents that Warner had never spoken to him about that.”

Nevertheless, sources “close to the federal investigation” confirmed to WSMV that federal authorities “are investigating whether or not Warner had paranoia that 5G technology was being used to spy on Americans.”

This theory seems to be based on the fact that the bombing happened right next to an AT&T store in Nashville and subsequently caused widespread outages to the provider’s Internet and cellular services in Kentucky and Tennessee.

Fridrich described Warner as a”nice guy” and a “techie guy” who “would do this thing and leave” and only ever spoke about his passion for camping.

“He didn’t bother anybody. He did his thing and leave,” he said to WSMV.

However, Warner’s Bakerstown Road neighbors preferred another adjective for him: “Oddball.”

“Tony Rodriguez lives in the second home of the duplex in Antioch that law enforcement searched Saturday. … Rodriguez said he never spoke to his neighbor and didn’t know his name,” The Washington Post reported.

“The few times Rodriguez saw the man, he was tinkering with an antenna above the house and power-washing the driveway behind their home. Rodriguez said the neighbor kept several ‘No Trespassing’ and warning signs around his property, particularly where he kept the RV.”

“He always seemed like an oddball,” Rodriguez added.

Rodriguez reportedly witnessed the search on Warner’s home and described seeing investigators carry out a computer motherboard from it.

Another neighbor, Steven Stone, confirmed to USA Today that he’d seen an RV outside the home.

“When I looked out my window and saw all the law enforcement that’s when it hit me that I’d see the camper up there,” he reportedly said.

(Source: Google Maps)

CBS News has reportedly confirmed that “at least two tips were called in to the FBI about Warner prior to the” bombing on Christmas Day.

The nature of these tips remains unclear.

What also remains unclear is Warner’s whereabouts. Remains were found at the scene of the bombing Friday, leading some to speculate that the bombing may have been a suicide.

While the remains hadn’t been identified as of Sunday morning, federal authorities were looking to swab Warner’s mother so they could compare her DNA to that of the remains.

“I would say, in order to identify the human remains, it’s likely a family member of Mr. Warner would be asked to provide DNA. This will most likely be done by the FBI, who is the lead investigative agency,” a senior law enforcement source told Newsweek.

“Assuming this is the mother of the bomber, the FBI labs are in 48-72 hour turnaround for confirmation.”

Vivek Saxena

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