‘Can we knock it off?’ Larry Elder shreds BLM demand for reparations with cold facts

Fox News host Tucker Carlson revisited the issue of forcing taxpayers to fund reparations for blacks with columnist and author Larry Elder, who pushed back on the idea and said it would only serve to further racially divide Americans.

Carlson introduced the segment by reminding viewers that Sen. Kamala Harris, set to become the vice president if Joe Biden takes office in January, pledged last year during her short bid for the presidency that she would sign reparations legislation.

He then pivoted to a clip of a young Black Lives Matter activist who praised and justified looting in Chicago in August as a form of “reparations.”

After playing both clips, Carlson brought in Elder and asked if mandatory reparations, which — depending on the scheme could cost $12 trillion — would further inflame or calm racial tensions.

Elder, who also hosts a daily radio show, said unequivocally that he believes mandating reparation payments would further divide the country along racial lines as he went into a lengthy explanation of the evolution of racial politics in the country.

He began by noting that when Barack Obama entered office to begin his first term, his approval rating hovered around 67 percent because, Elder said, a majority of Americans wanted him to succeed.

Elder then recounted an interview that civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. gave to the BBC in the 1960s in which he predicted within 40 years the country would have its first black president — a prediction that turned out to be prophetic after Obama was elected.

The radio host and syndicated columnist then discussed a 2007 survey which found that more people, by far, said they would vote for a black man for president rather than a female (Hillary Clinton), a Mormon (Mitt Romney) or a man who would be 72 when inaugurated (the late Sen. John McCain).

“Obama has less of a disadvantage than these three white people,” Elder said. “So, can we knock it off?”

Elder went on to discuss another survey conducted in 1997 by CNN and Time magazine — “two left-wing organizations” — asked a group of black teens and a group of white teens if they believed that racism was a serious problem in America.

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After noting that a majority of respondents in both groups answered in the affirmative, Elder said the outlets then asked the group of black teens if racism was “a big problem, a small problem, or no problem in your own daily life.”

“Eighty-nine percent said ‘small problem’ or ‘no problem,’” he explained, adding that more black teens than white teens said a bigger problem was blacks not taking advantage of programs that could help them get ahead.

“That was 23 years ago, before Obama got elected let alone reelected,” said Elder. “Can we knock it off? Racism has never been a less significant problem in American life than today.”

Carlson responded by saying if the same survey taken in 1997 were taken today, many more people would say that racism is a much worse problem now.

“You probably would,” Elder said, going on to reference a black sociologist whom he did not name who said in the 1990s that America had become the least-racist majority-white country in history while offering blacks the most opportunities, even more than all majority-black African countries.

“Let’s take advantage of the fact that we…hit the lottery we were born in this country. Come on,” Elder concluded.

Jon Dougherty

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