Sen. Rand Paul: ‘No real evidence’ lockdowns are slowing the spread of Covid-19

U.S. Senator Rand Paul is sure that lockdowns and other restrictive measures issued to combat coronavirus are not really “changing the trajectory” of the pandemic.

The Kentucky Republican told Fox News on Monday that there appears to be “no real evidence” that the various shutdowns and other orders issued by local and state government officials have been really effective in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

“You know, without question, this virus has been devastating to so many families,” Paul told The Story host Martha MacCallum on Monday, adding that he and his wife Kelley “lost a good friend today and we’re grieving for them and our prayers go out to their family.”

“But the thing is, we ought to at least still use logic to try to figure out– how we stop this …,” the lawmaker continued.

(Source: Fox News)

“I don’t see any evidence that crowd-control, hand-washing, standing six feet apart, all of these things they tell you to do — closing down the restaurants, closing down the schools — there’s no real evidence that they are changing the trajectory of the disease,” Paul noted.

The senator told MacCallum that “if you look at the incidence of COVID, it’s going up … exponentially despite all the mandates. So those who say there is science just aren’t paying attention to it,” he added,

“This isn’t a lack of compassion,” the Kentucky senator clarified. “I want people to get the vaccine, I want them to be able to avoid this scourge, but at the same time, keeping all our kids home isn’t changing the course of this disease.”

“They’ve studied this in four different country-wide studies. They’ve studied the incidence of the disease, they’ve studied the transference of the disease, and they’ve found that closing schools doesn’t work. Even the socialist de Blasio is now opening schools,” Paul said, referring to Democratic New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Later in the segment, Paul clarified that he was not recommending that everyone go ahead and attend church.

“I think there are some people in our society where there are dangers to go and sit in church for two hours. If you’re in your mid-80s and you’re listening to this, I’m not recommending it,” he said. “But I’m also telling you that the government shouldn’t tell you you can’t go to church and the government shouldn’t tell you can’t send your kids to a religious school.”

He added that “there’s good advice and you can take advice and you can give advice. But once you mandate it, it doesn’t become advice. It becomes a form of tyranny.”

“So I think the government should not be in the form of mandating these things, because sometimes the science isn’t clear and sometimes they change their mind on the science month-to-month and week-to-week,” Paul said.

The senator also spoke about a stalled emergency relief bill in Congress where lawmakers have been negotiating a $908 billion stimulus package to alleviate the economic effects of the pandemic.

Paul contended that, in general, “more stimulus is just more borrowed money and not good for the country.”

“Right now there’s about three and a half million jobs that would be filled immediately if you weren’t paying people more not to work,” he said. “I want to give people money, they are out of work but if you give them more than they normally made by working, they will continue — you institutionalize unemployment, so it’s a big mistake to continue unemployment above the normal level.”

The senator contended that “we really should be looking at this in a rational way and not saying oh, let’s just print more money and borrow more money.”

“We are getting out of this and as soon as we get the vaccine we are going to get out of this in a rapid fashion,” Paul said. “And all I would say to government officials is let’s get the vaccine out as soon as we can.”

Frieda Powers

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