‘Did you read the article?’ Ilhan Omar links to piece criticizing her own bill to defend against backlash

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U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar’s recent call to “cancel” rent and mortgage payments prompted a well-deserved wave of social media criticism.

The Minnesota Democrat then sparked a round of mockery after she backed her argument by linking to an article elaborating on her proposed bill, the Rent and Mortgage Cancellation Act. While Omar urged her Twitter followers to read up about the legislation in the Market Realist piece, what she apparently missed was the article’s criticism of the act which “could end up being even worse for struggling Americans” than the coronavirus crisis.

“Cancel rent and mortgage payments,” Omar tweeted on Wednesday.

The progressive “Squad” member’s simplistic take, in what seems to be another attack on wealthy Americans, was part of her narrative on getting the federal government to suspend all housing payments until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But her call was met with immediate pushback by Twitter users.

Omar followed up with another tweet directing users to read an article about her bill, which was introduced in the U.S. House in April.

The piece, published and updated in Market Realist two months ago, addressed H.R. 6515 as “legislation that, if passed, might actually help” struggling Americans who have been trying to keep up with their rent or mortgage payments amid the pandemic’s effects.

But Omar apparently did not delve too deeply into the article written by Andrew Krosofsky, who told readers that, like other proposed legislation, the bill’s “details are somewhat confusing,” and that there are problems with “good intentions and poor execution.”

Omar’s bill proposes that rent and mortgage payments, retroactive to April 1, will be eliminated and suspending payments will remain in effect until 30 days after the “official end” of the pandemic crisis.

“As well-intentioned as it sounds, the end result of such an act could end up being even worse for struggling Americans than the crisis that required it. No matter how many provisions are made for the government to reimburse landlords and lenders, it isn’t likely that the reimbursements would be made in a timely manner,” the article explained.

Landlords will have “just as much to worry about financially as the people that live in their buildings,” Krosofsky argued, noting their reliance on payments as a source of income and that thousands may end up being evicted at the end of the crisis when the protection expires.

“Despite the bill’s inherent problems, it has attracted 27 House cosponsors,” he wrote.

“Evicting millions of people during a pandemic would be a moral outrage,” Omar tweeted last month, reacting to a CNN . “Cancel rent and mortgage payments now.”

The article also pointed to another problem with the measure which does not include language setting any kind of income threshold,  so anyone can claim to qualify and allege they are unable to make rent or mortgage payments.

Problems with the bill aside, the fact that Omar linked to the article which highlighted its shortcomings and the potential that it could “backfire” on those struggling under coronavirus effects, was fodder for Twitter users mocking the congresswoman and her socialist policies.

Frieda Powers

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