The price for selling out Arizona? Cindy McCain’s expected to be offered job as UK ambassador

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The widow of the late Sen. John McCain may be set to be the next U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom if Joe Biden is inaugurated in January.

Cindy McCain may see a reward for crossing party lines and backing the Democrat nominee in the 2020 presidential race, helping get Arizona and its 11 electoral votes “delivered” for Biden though it has traditionally been seen as a red state.

The 66-year-old McCain, one of the most outspoken Republicans to back Biden, is seen by Democrats as being a key factor in flipping the state her late husband represented as a Republican senator from 1987 until his death from cancer in 2018.

“It’s hers if she wants it,” a Biden insider told The Times of London. “She delivered Arizona. They know that.”

McCain took part in the Democratic National Convention in August and endorsed Biden back in September. Following the election night results, she said she was “pleased” with the direction of the state in choosing to hand the Democrat the victory there, as Biden beat President Donald Trump with a razor-thin margin and a difference of just over 10,000 votes.

“Our country needed a new direction to heal the wounds caused by the outgoing administration; Arizonans showed up in record numbers and I am pleased that many joined me supporting Joe Biden, who has won Arizona’s 11 electoral votes,” McCain said in a statement following the election earlier this month.

McCain’s backing of Biden set off criticism among Trump’s supporters who see her actions as costing Republicans the state, which Trump won against Hillary Clinton by 3.5 percentage points back in 2016. Biden became the first Democrat since former President Bill Clinton to win the battleground state.

“Congratulations Cindy McCain. You helped cost us Arizona,” talk radio and Fox News host Mark Levin fired off at McCain after Fox News made the controversial decision on election night to prematurely call Arizona for Biden.

McCain, who currently serves as chair of the board of trustees of the McCain Institute for International Leadership at Arizona State University, is a registered Republican. She openly endorsed Trump’s Democratic opponent citing the decades-long friendship between the Bidens and the McCains, and had openly criticized the president before the election.

Trump had frequently attacked the late John McCain, who was a Vietnam War veteran and a six-term U.S. senator as well as being the GOP presidential nominee in 2008 when he lost the race to Barack Obama and his vice-presidential running mate, Biden.

Cindy McCain campaigned with Biden and his running mate Kamala Harris when they visited Arizona ahead of the election. She also appeared in a Biden campaign ad that aired across the state. On the evening of the election, she penned an op-ed published in USA Today explaining why Biden was “the best choice” as president.

“He will be a leader whom all Americans can count on to put country above party, patriotism above partisanship, and national interest ahead of his own. Most important, Joe will unite a deeply divided country and bring together all Americans to address and overcome the great challenges we face,” she wrote at the time. “I can vouch for these qualifications, because I have known him for four decades. He will have the vote of this proud Republican on Tuesday.”

McCain has not yet commented on the possibility of her accepting an ambassadorship in a potential Biden administration. The current United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom is Robert Wood Johnson IV who was appointed by Trump in 2017. The 73-year-old billionaire owns the New York Jets and is heir to the Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical fortune.

Twitter users weighed in on Biden’s possible reward for McCain and how the “old guard” will be returning to Washington, D.C. if he is certified as the next president.

 

Frieda Powers

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