‘Too conciliatory’: Joy Reid’s worried Biden will make way for ‘a smart version of Trump’ in 2024

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Though it’s been four long years since President Donald Trump was elected president, it seems left-wing media figures like MSNBC’s Joy Reid still haven’t figured out how and why he managed to secure such an unexpected, earth-shattering victory over the establishment.

On Tuesday, the far-left host and her guests complained that Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden is being too “conciliatory” with the right.

To Reid and those like her, it’d be better if Biden would just steamroll over conservatives just as former President Barack Hussein Obama had done years earlier.

Never mind that demonizing, denigrating, and ignoring the interests of conservatives is one of the factors that led to Trump’s catapulting to power in the 2016 race.

Listen to their remarks below:

“Does it worry you at all that Biden might be too conciliatory in who he brings in?” the clip above began with Reid, the host of MSNBC’s “The ReidOut,” asking.

Instead of nominating far-left radicals to his potential Cabinet, Biden has opted for more establishment, perhaps even “centrist” (depending on your definition of centrism, of course) nominees who wouldn’t be as apt to pursue a radical agenda.

Reid’s first guest, Melody Barnes of the University of Virginia, defended Biden’s choices, saying he’s seeking to “foster a diversity of opinions” and arguing that “he’s going to make the decision that he thinks is the best set of decisions for the country.”

But Reid’s other guest, far-left Morgan State University professor Jason Johnson, disagreed.

It’s not clear why Johnson was even allowed on the program. given as he’d been suspended earlier this year for smearing then-Democrat presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ supporters as “racist white liberals” and “misfit black girls.”

“This is the greatest concern I had about Joe Biden even though I always thought he was a candidate most likely to win among all the Democrats,” he moaned.

He’s too conciliatory. … Joe Biden needs to recognize that he has four years to make the case that obnoxious, aggressive, white nationalist Trumpism isn’t effective, that he can rally the country around strong difficult principles again. That means picking people who may sometimes buck the trend.”

And there it was. Despite the president winning more minority votes than any Republican candidate in 60 years, Johnson felt compelled to repeat the canard that the president’s support — and really all Republicanism — is rooted in racism.

“What I want to see is who he picks on a domestic level, who he takes for secretary of labor, who he takes for interior, who he ends up putting in for attorney general,” Johnson continued.

“Because the domestic changes that will support American life and protect children who are coming over here as refugees across the border, that will be what really determines if Joe Biden ran on changing the soul of America or trying to take us to some fictitious heyday of the Obama days that weren’t great to begin with.”

Reid agreed, adding that she fears a “conciliatory” approach could lead to another Trump — a stronger, “smarter” one …

“Biden can come in and try to be FDR and say, ‘I’m going to make big change because big change is required in this moment.’ He could be LBJ and say, ‘Dammit, I know I’m a Southerner, but this can’t last. We have to make dramatic change.’ Or he can try to come in and be a conciliator and just try to hold the line, be more of a Carter and say, ‘I just want everyone to get along. And let’s try to do smaller things that are nice but don’t really change anything,'” she said.

That feels to me — I think I’m with Jason on this — I feel like it sets up 2024 to be a referendum on nothing happened, nothing changed in my life, so give me another rule breaker. And then we could get somebody, a smart version of Trump. And that’s what scares me most.”

While it’s true Trump won in part because voters wanted a change, it’s equally true that he won because a large number of Americans — not all of them Republican — grew fed up with the Democrats’ radicalism, from their increasing attacks on Christianity to their embrace of radical-identity politics and political correctness.

They also grew exasperated with Obama’s willingness to flout constitutional law to push forth with his radical agenda:

The fact is Obama was and remains a radical. The only reason his radicalism didn’t reach full fruition was because the public quickly cut off his levers of power by handing first the House and then the Senate, back to the GOP.

Biden is within his rights to follow Reid’s advice and pursue the same strategy of demonizing his opponents and promoting radical policies. And if Democrats retake the Senate in January, he’d certainly have the impetus for it.

But if Reid genuinely believes that Biden pursuing a radical agenda just like his predecessor will somehow stop Trump or someone like him from returning to power, she’s most likely mistaken.

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Vivek Saxena

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