Candace Owens warns Harry Styles’ Vogue ball gown coincides with Marxism: ‘Bring back manly men’

Conservative pundit and author Candace Owens ripped “Cherry” singer Harry Styles’ new cover on American Vogue for wearing a ball gown and a custom-made Gucci jacket.

“There is no society that can survive without strong men,” Owens, 31, author of “Blackout,” posted on Twitter in response to the pics of Styles after he became the magazine’s first solo male cover.

“The East knows this. In the west, the steady feminization of our men at the same time that Marxism is being taught to our children is not a coincidence. It is an outright attack. Bring back manly men.”

Owens was both praised and attacked online, which is par for the course, but she gave no indication of backing down.

Warning: Strong language

https://twitter.com/no_silenced/status/1328332887788187649

In the Vogue article, Styles discusses how much he loves clothing that is traditionally worn by women.

“I’ll go in shops sometimes, and I just find myself looking at the women’s clothes thinking they’re amazing,” he said, adding that “you can never be overdressed. There’s no such thing.”

“There’s so much joy to be had in playing with clothes. I’ve never thought too much about what it means—it just becomes this extended part of creating something,” he notes further.

Styles goes on to say that non-traditional, flashy outfits felt “mind-blowing” to him as a child, but he feels much more comfortable in more extreme wear these days.

“Now I’ll put on something that feels really flamboyant, and I don’t feel crazy wearing it. I think if you get something that you feel amazing in, it’s like a superhero outfit,” he told the magazine.

“Clothes are there to have fun with and experiment with and play with. What’s really exciting is that all of these lines are just kind of crumbling away. When you take away ‘There’s clothes for men and there’s clothes for women,’ once you remove any barriers, obviously you open up the arena in which you can play,” he noted further.

As for Owens’ assertion that Western culture has, for years, sought to downplay male masculinity, she’s far from the only one to make the same observation.

“I am not saying that extremes of masculinity, which could include violence, are acceptable,” Mark Sherman, Ph.D., a psychologist and academic, wrote in March 2018.

“But given the association of masculine traits with self-esteem and success, something which our society has now at least tacitly recognized for our daughters, and given the many ways in which boys and young men are lagging behind girls and young women in their education as well as many other ways, it seems unwise to feminize our sons while we encourage independence, self-confidence, and competitiveness in our daughters,” he added.

Others on the left, especially, have also complained about so-called “toxic masculinity.”

In September 2019, Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), one of the “Squad” members, used the term to lash out against an alleged “honor killing” of a Muslim woman by her brother.

In October 2018, Fox News host Tucker Carlson ripped singer John Mayer after he later called out the “bulls**t Alpha Male contract” he says makes some men behave badly toward women.

In January 2019, Gillette razor company introduced an ad campaign titled, “The Best a Man Can Get,” featuring male behaviors like bullying, sexual harassment, and sexism.

The ad calls out “toxic masculinity” and included this YouTube description: “Bullying. Harassment. Is this the best a man can get?”

The ad was blasted by Villanova University Prof. Charles Taylor, who wrote in Forbes, “The use of the term ‘toxic masculinity’ in the ad was a flat-out mistake. While only mentioned quickly and briefly, the use of this term, which many men associate with a one-sided critique and stereotype of an entire gender [sic].”

Ultimately, Gillette took multi-billion-dollar losses following the ad campaign.

 

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Jon Dougherty

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