AOC says she doesn’t know if she wants to stay in politics since she is the enemy of her own party

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE


CHECK OUT WeThePeople.store for best SWAG!

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez continued to bemoan her own party in an interview with The New York Times published Sunday, saying she is just as likely to start a “homestead” somewhere as to remain in politics and seek higher office.

Asked if the pushback she’s getting from Democratic Party elders in the House would spur a Senate bid in the future, the New York lawmaker demurred.

“I genuinely don’t know. I don’t even know if I want to be in politics. You know, for real, in the first six months of my term, I didn’t even know if I was going to run for re-election this year,” she told the Times.

When asked why she replied: “It’s the incoming. It’s the stress. It’s the violence. It’s the lack of support from your own party. It’s your own party thinking you’re the enemy. When your own colleagues talk anonymously in the press and then turn around and say you’re bad because you actually append your name to your opinion.

“I chose to run for re-election because I felt like I had to prove that this is real. That this movement was real. That I wasn’t a fluke,” she added. “That people really want guaranteed health care and that people really want the Democratic Party to fight for them.

“But I’m serious when I tell people the odds of me running for higher office and the odds of me just going off trying to start a homestead somewhere — they’re probably the same,” the self-described Democratic Socialist added.

Democrats expected to pick up seats and expand their majority in the House on Election Day, as well as regaining control of the Senate and winning the White House.

At present, it’s not clear that Joe Biden has won the presidency, though most major media outlets have declared him the victor. Also, the GOP is on pace to retain the Senate, while Republicans gained House seats.

The House losses were being blamed, in part, by Democrats’ shift to the hard-left positions espoused by Ocasio-Cortez.

In a Democratic Caucus meeting leaked last week to the media, freshman Rep. Abigail Spanberger of Virginia said the party will be “f–king torn apart” in 2022 if members continued to espouse hard-left positions.

Spanberger said “no one should say ‘defund the police’ ever again” and “nobody should be talking about socialism.”

Meanwhile, Rep. Jim Clyburn, a black Democrat who represents South Carolina, also warned his party if “we are going to run on Medicare for All, defund the police, socialized medicine, we’re not going to win.”

Ocasio-Cortez, however, pushed back on social media, claiming the shift to the hard-left was not responsible for the party’s losses.

In a Sunday appearance with CNN’s Jake Tapper, the New York lawmaker continued to push back against claims that left-wing extremism hurt the party this year while downplaying her comments to the Times about getting pushback from her own party and perhaps leaving politics altogether.

While acknowledging that the Democratic caucus does have “very deep divisions” over policy, “I believe we need to really come together and not allow Republican narratives to tear us apart.”

She also said all Democratic candidates who ran on “Medicare for All” won their races, and that so-called “progressive” ideas are an “asset” the Democratic Party hasn’t fully embraced.

Jon Dougherty

Staff Writer
[email protected]

Jon is a staff writer for BizPac Review with 30 years' worth of reporting experience, as well as an author and U.S. Army veteran. He has a BA in political science from Ashford University and an MA in national security studies/intelligence analysis from American Military University.
Jon Dougherty

Comments

Latest Articles