Michigan officials deny GOP’s claim that a software ‘glitch’ gave Republican votes to Dems, call it ‘accidental error’

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An alleged technical glitch reportedly caused Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden to receive 6,000 votes in Michigan that were actually for incumbent President Donald Trump. Though the glitch has reportedly been rectified and the votes returned to the president, questions remain over how widespread this glitch may have been.

“In Antrim County, ballots were counted for Democrats that were meant for Republicans, causing a 6,000 vote swing against our candidates,” Michigan Republican Party chair Laura Cox announced at a press conference Friday.

She added, “The county clerk came forward and said, ‘tabulating software glitched and caused a miscalculation of the votes.’ Since then, we have now discovered that 47 counties used this same software in the same capacity.”

Antrim County had to hand-count all of the ballots, and these counties that used this software need to closely examine their results for similar discrepancies.”

Listen:

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, a Democrat, responded to concerns about the glitch by denying that it was a glitch at all.

“The erroneous reporting of unofficial results from Antrim County was a result of an accidental error on the part of the Antrim County Clerk,” she claimed in a statement.

“The equipment and software did not malfunction and all ballots were properly tabulated. However, the clerk accidentally did not update the software used to collect voting machine data and report unofficial results.”

But speaking with the Detroit Free Press, University of Michigan computer science professor J. Alex Halderman, a voting machine expert, cast doubt on this claim.

“[I]t’s plausibly human error, but if a simple screw-up could cause these problems, that sounds like a technical design flaw,” he reportedly said.

He added, “It’s natural to wonder whether similar problems could have occurred in other jurisdictions that use the same machine.”

Indeed, Antrim County isn’t alone in reporting glitches attributable to Dominion Voting Systems, the election management software system reportedly responsible for swinging 6,000 votes away from the president and toward Democrat nominee Biden.

Over in Georgia, another glitch linked to the same software suite had reportedly caused voting to be halted for several hours Tuesday morning.

“Voters were unable to cast machine ballots for a couple of hours in Morgan and Spalding counties after the electronic devices crashed. … The counties use voting machines made by Dominion Voting Systems and electronic poll books — used to sign in voters — made by KnowInk,” Politico reported.

The companies’ uploaded something last night, which is not normal, and it caused a glitch,’ said Marcia Ridley, elections supervisor at Spalding County Board of Election. That glitch prevented pollworkers from using the pollbooks to program smart cards that the voters insert into the voting machines.”

According to reports, concerns over the reliability of Dominion Voting Systems predated the 2020 presidential election but were apparently never addressed in either Michigan or Georgia, though they were reportedly addressed in Texas.

“Election Systems & Software, Dominion Voting Systems & Hart InterCivic … make an estimated 80% of all voting machines in use. … They have faced criticism over a lack of transparency and reluctance to open up their proprietary systems to outside testing,” the Associated Press reported in January.

At the time, executives from all three were forced to appear before Congress to speak about concerns from lawmakers vis-a-vis “foreign components in the nation’s election equipment,” according to the AP.

“Several of those components, to our knowledge, there is no option for manufacturing those in the United States,” John Poulos, the CEO of Dominion, admitted at the hearing.

This is problematic because of concerns over “what is known as supply-chain security, the tampering of election equipment during manufacturing,” as reported by the AP.

“The executives acknowledged there is no method of voting that is 100 percent secure. … The three companies also acknowledged that some of their equipment allows for the transmission of election-night vote counts via modem, a vulnerability security experts say hackers could exploit. They said some state and local election offices require this, although some states and jurisdictions prohibit the practice,” the report continued.

As of Saturday morning, Biden was leading Trump in the battleground states of Georgia, Pennsylvania, Arizona and Nevada. All four states rely on Dominion Voting Systems to one degree or another.

According to Reuters, Dominion is used in Maricopa County, Arizona, and according to the Las Vegas Sun, it’s sued in Clark County, Nevada.

Both counties are among those that have taken the most time to count votes.

As of Saturday morning, Biden was leading in both counties.

Vivek Saxena

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