Biden may eek out a victory but GOP gains will keep him in check

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Though the outcome of the presidential race had yet to be decided by midday Wednesday, there has been some speculation that should Democratic nominee Joe Biden pull off a victory, getting his agenda through is going to be difficult, if not impossible, analysts noted.

“This is not the outcome Democrats expected,” noted Politico’s Ryan Lizza, who was reflecting on the party’s inability to win more House seats and take control of the Senate, at least for the time being.

“Despite many bold predictions of a rout in which Democrats gained (or re-gained) Trumpian red territory of 2016, as of early Wednesday only one state — Arizona — had flipped from red to blue. Six states remain outstanding: Georgia, North Carolina, Nevada, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania,” he wrote.

In fact, Arizona is still in play as of this writing, and the Trump campaign believes it’ll win the state in the end.

Should Biden take Arizona, however, along with Nevada — also razor-thin at the moment — he may wind up with 290 electoral votes, which is more than George W. Bush won in 2000 and 2004 (271 and 286 respectively) but far fewer than Barack Obama’s two wins (365 and 332 respectively) and President Donald Trump’s 306 electoral college tally.

So, not really a commanding mandate, especially after Republicans beat back high-dollar assaults in the Senate.

“If Biden squeaks by, he will have no popular mandate, no Senate, and no help from the Supreme Court. He won’t be able to pass tax increases, big changes in health care, or his Green New Deal boondoggles. He will have the same headaches confirming his favorite nominees as Trump did, and worse, as a Republican Senate casts a jaundiced eye at Biden’s supporting cast,” David P. Goldman writes at PJ Media.

At the same time, Democrats are currently losing ground in the House. Though Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Democratic leaders confidently predicted pre-election that the party was poised to steal anywhere from five to 15 seats from Republicans, in fact, it’s the GOP that, thus far, has added five seats to its total and is seriously challenging a handful of other Democrats.

That fact alone will put renewed, and unprecedented, pressure on Pelosi to make deals with the GOP Senate such as new relief for the COVID-19 pandemic and funding the government, which will come up again in December.

What’s more, the fact that the election results in several states remain close or in the president’s favor destroys the narrative that Trump was just an anomaly who was about to be soundly rejected by his party’s voters — a belief that was always at odds with the magnificent turnout the president generated at his rallies.

That said, a President Biden will be free to reverse some of President Trump’s executive orders and policy initiatives, including returning to the Obama-era Iran ‘nuclear deal,’ rejoining the Paris Climate Accords, and globalist trade deals Trump and Republicans say have harmed U.S. economic security for decades.

But Biden has to win first, and at least at this point, he hasn’t.

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Jon Dougherty

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