Matthew McConaughey condemns cancel culture, defends his faith in Hollywood, offers advice on defunding cops

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Actor Matthew McConaughey condemned the cancel culture mentality recently and called out Hollywood liberals for their hypocrisy.

The star of films such as “Dallas Buyers Club” and “Interstellar” gave his take on discrimination in Hollywood and his Christian faith while also touching on several other hot issues during an interview on “The Joe Rogan Experience.”

McConaughey defended his faith and the Bible in a discussion about one of the characters he played in the 1997 movie, “Contact” which was about a scientist’s efforts to communicate with extraterrestrial life. The 50-year-old actor did not shy away from the questions, establishing that ” a lot of great truths” can be found in the Bible.

Though he thought the teachings and philosophies of the Bible are very valid, he admitted he struggles with the larger examples of miracles and supernatural events chronicled in the Book. But McConaughey contended that one should not dismiss the entire Bible just because there are portions that stir up questions, making his segway into speaking on the cancel culture practice in society today.


(Source: Rogan/YouTube)

“We’re making people persona non grata because of something they do that is right now deemed wrong or it’s the hot point in a hot topic right now,” McConaughey told Rogan.

“You can’t erase someone’s entire existence. Where the heck does some forgiveness go?” he asked.

He admitted he “hasn’t had any difficulties” with discrimination over his faith in the very liberal Hollywood world but did note the phony actions of his fellow actors.

“I have had moments where I was on stage receiving an award in front of my peers in Hollywood,” McConaughey said. “And there were people in the crowd that I have prayed with before dinners, many times.”

“And when I thank God, I saw some of those people go to clap, but then notice that, ‘This could be a bad thing on my resume,’ and then sit back on their hands. I’ve seen people read the room and go, ‘That wouldn’t bode well for me in the future for getting a job or getting votes or what have you.’ I have seen that, I have witnessed that. I don’t judge them for it,” he said.

McConaughey did not hesitate to thank God when he accepted the Best Actor award for “Dallas Buyers Club” in 2014.

“First off I want to thank God, because that’s who I look up to. He’s graced my life with opportunities that I know are not of my hand or any other human hand,” the Texas-born actor said after receiving the Oscar. “He has shown me that it’s a scientific fact that gratitude reciprocates. In the words of the late (British actor) Charlie Laughton, who said, ‘When you got God you got a friend and that friend is you.'”

In calling out the leftist views in Tinsel Town, McConaughey told Rogan that some go so far left that they become “illiberal.”

“Some people in our industry, not all them, but there’s some that go to the left so far…that go to the illiberal left side so far, that is so condescending and patronizing to 50 percent of the world that need the empathy that the liberals side gives and should give,” he said.

“To throw somebody, to illegitimize them because they say they are a believer is just so arrogant, and in some ways hypocritical to me,” he added.

In another segment of the interview, the actor weighed in on the calls to “defund” the police.

“It’s almost like it should have been renamed because ‘defund’ does not sound anything like there’s been money reallocated to different areas of handling some police exercise,” McConaughey said. “It sounds like you got a million and, ‘We’re taking three hundred thousand. Good luck.’ And it’s not exactly what it is, to be fair.”

“The community and the police need to get back together, and the community needs to say, ‘Here’s what’s unfair. Here’s how I feel it’s unfair as a black man or a person of color or whatever the situation. Here’s my problem with my relationship with you as cops,'” the actor added.

He contended that police should be able to admit that a “few of these bad apples need to be removed. But they also we need to make sure we’re training them better.”

“Now, also, the cops need to go to the community and go, ‘Can you all remember and understand our point of view that we’re like the tow truck driver. We’re not called when there’s good news; we’re called when it’s bad news,” McConaughey continued. “‘So we’re coming in looking for trouble. So we’re already under stress when we get a call. Can y’all help us in the way we communicate? Can we get trust again?'”

Frieda Powers

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

Originally from New York, Powers graduated from New York University and eventually made her way to sunny South Florida where she has been writing for the BizPacReview team since 2015.
Frieda Powers

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