Alyssa Milano dragged back to history class after indignant, untrue ‘unprecedented’ SCOTUS tweet

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Actress Alyssa Milano was schooled again after another one of her ignorant complaints about President Donald Trump and his administration.

The drama queen was quickly set straight on social media after whining about Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court on Saturday. Milano, who also had a hard time accepting Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, claimed on Sunday that moving forward with Barrett “defies every precedent” in U.S. history.

Although the president considered nominating Barrett back in 2018, he ultimately went with Kavanaugh, saving Barrett to now fill the Supreme Court seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died on September 18. Democrats have been up in arms over the decision by Trump and Republicans to move ahead with the confirmation process in an election year, and just weeks away from Election Day.

Barrett was already under attack by the left even before Trump formally announced her nomination over the weekend, as everything from her professional career and jurisprudence to her personal faith and role as a mother have been smeared.

“Never before in our nation’s history has a Supreme Court Justice been nominated and installed while a presidential election is already underway,” Milano claimed in a tweet on Sunday.

“It defies every precedent and every expectation of a nation where the people are sovereign and the rule of law reigns,” the left-wing activist added.

But Milano’s rant about the unprecedented move was soon fact-checked to reveal that confirmations in an election year are not actually so rare.

David Shafer, a former Georgia state senator and currently serving as chairman of the Georgia Republican Party, responded to Milano’s misinformation.

Responding to another Twitter user defending Milano’s take, one person even provided a graph to help visualize the facts.

Despite the meltdown over Barret’s nomination, and the left’s horror that Ginsburg was being disrespected this way, it was the late Supreme Court justice’s own words in 2016 that stated it is the Senate’s “job” to move forward with the process after a president names the nominee, regardless of it being close to an election.

“There’s nothing in the Constitution that says the president stops being president in his last year,” Ginsburg said at the time former President Barack Obama nominated Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court.

“There has been a Supreme Court vacancy arising in an election year 29 times in American history. In 10 of those cases the presidency was held by one party and the Senate was held by a different party,” U.S. Sen. Mike Lee wrote in an op-ed published by Fox News last week.

“Nine of those 10 nominees were rejected by the Senate, just like Garland was rejected,” the Utah Republican  noted of the “historical norm.”

“On the other hand, there have been 19 times when a Supreme Court seat became vacant in an election year where both the presidency and the Senate were controlled by the same party,” Lee added. “Confirming Supreme Court justices when both parties control the White House and Senate in an election year is perfectly normal. Indeed, it may be the most normal thing Washington does in this most unusual year.”

“In truth, leftist outrage mobs and the political press don’t really want a Supreme Court of impartial judges at all. Instead, they want a permanent Constitutional Convention, controlled by woke philosopher kings and queens, imposing leftist policies that the American people can’t be bullied into supporting,” Lee wrote.

Meanwhile, the latest from Milano, who wore a Handmaid’s Tale–style outfit in her 2018 protests over Kavanaugh, got plenty of blowback on Twitter.

 

Frieda Powers

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

Originally from New York, Powers graduated from New York University and eventually made her way to sunny South Florida where she has been writing for the BizPacReview team since 2015.
Frieda Powers

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