Trump oddly accused of strategically picking SCOTUS nom to gain ‘white male vote’

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President Donald Trump is expected to reveal his Supreme Court nominee but his critics are already spouting theories about his choice of one potential candidate.

With many reports indicating that Trump intends to nominate Amy Coney Barrett to fill the Supreme Court seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, New York Times journalist Maggie Haberman is convinced the choice is based on the president’s need to appeal to his base of white and male voters.

Democrats have already been condemning Trump for moving forward with a nomination just weeks away from the election and some far-left groups are even pressing lawmakers to do all they can to discredit the potential nominee regardless of who it is.

The president is expected to reveal his pick later on Saturday but with many expecting it to be Barrett, the scrutiny and criticism has already begun. In a CNN interview, Haberman made the claim that Barrett “does please the base.”

The White House correspondent for The New York Times told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Friday that Trump and his advisers believe Barrett has a “solid record that would appeal to his conservative base.”

Trump, she noted, has not “been receptive” to pleas for him to choose Barbara Lagoa, a Florida judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit whose parents fled Fidel Castro’s communist regime in Cuba in the 1960s and who would apparently have more “cross-over appeal” for voters.

“Whenever the president has a choice, he tends to burrow into his white and largely male base of voters. And that is what he is doing here,” she said.


(Source: Fox News)

“Kim, are you going to start laughing?” Fox News host Laura Ingraham asked her guest, Kimberley Strassel, a member of the Wall Street Journal editorial board, during “The Ingraham Angle” on Friday.

“I mean, did the president pick Amy Coney Barrett for the white, male vote? Okay? I have heard of a lot of really ridiculous things, but that is at the top of the list,” Ingraham laughed.

“Look, there are so many things to like about this nominee and that will transcend, believe me, the white male vote,” Strassel replied, citing Barrett’s jurisprudence, which “speaks for itself.”

The Fox News contributor went on to note that the former Notre Dame law professor who serves on the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, is “smart” and “consistent.”

“She has been through this process and she handled it amazing aplomb and grace. She has been through the process and that is going to help her a lot this time,” Strassel added, referring to Barrett’s 2017 nomination process.

“How cool is it to get a working mom on the Supreme Court…a  working mom of seven kids. You know, this woman is going to be something to reckon with as she goes through this,” Strassel added. “I hope that Democrats learn something from the Kavanaugh experience because I keep reminding people four of them lost their seats in contested states after they voted no.”

Earlier, Ingraham asked The Federalist’s Mollie Hemingway about the “ugliness” from Democrats and the media during the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh.

“Is there any way this could be as bad or is she somewhat insulated? She is a woman. She is a mother. It’s an election year,” the Fox News host asked.

“Well, if past is prologue, the most contentious battles and confirmations are when you actually see a switch from a more liberal to a more conservative justice. So by all that we know historically, this should be apocalyptic,” Hemingway replied.

She wondered if Barrett’s good reputation and large base of support from friends and colleagues will make it “more difficult for the left to engage in the type of smear operation they did against Kavanaugh.”

“I think it takes a lot of courage for anybody to be willing to be nominated to the Supreme Court after what happened to Brett Kavanaugh and how people in the media and other partisans tried to destroy his life and his reputation and his family,” Hemingway said. “It takes a lot of courage for someone to do this. I think it is really remarkable what we are about to experience here.”

Frieda Powers

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

Originally from New York, Powers graduated from New York University and eventually made her way to sunny South Florida where she has been writing for the BizPacReview team since 2015.
Frieda Powers

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