Democrat state lawmaker who wrote ‘Breonna’s Law’ arrested in Louisville for first-degree rioting

The problem with politics in post-Obama America is that for the Democrat Party, the line between politicians and radical activists has been blurred into oblivion.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in Louisville, Kentucky, where Black Lives Matter protesters took to the streets this week to express their disappointment in a grand jury decision to charge just one officer in the death of Breonna Taylor — the charge being wanton endangerment.

 

Protests that erupted immediately after Wednesday’s decision continued Thursday evening, and police arrested a number of protestors, including Democratic state Rep. Attica Scott. The lawmaker was charged with first-degree rioting, failure to disperse and unlawful assembly, the Courier Journal reported.

Scott’s daughter, Ashanti Scott, was arrested on the same three charges, as was well known racial justice activist Shameka Parrish-Wright — the women were arrested together.

Not just any state lawmaker, Scott wrote and introduced “Breonna’s Law,” a statewide proposal that would end “no-knock” search warrants.

Police were serving a “no-knock” warrant at Taylor’s house in March, as part of an ongoing drug investigation — the officers involved said they announced themselves, even though they weren’t required to do.

After breaking down the door, Taylor’s boyfriend opened fire on police, striking one officer in the leg. In a return of gunfire, Taylor was killed — the boyfriend claims he did not hear the police announce themselves and thought it may be Taylor’s ex-boyfriend breaking into the apartment.

At least 24 people were arrested Wednesday night, according to the newspaper, with all but one arrested near the Louisville Free Public Library. Around 9 pm, as a curfew went into effect, a library window was reportedly broken and flare thrown into the building.

Scott was released Friday morning and is set to be arraigned on Oct. 6., in the event that the charges are still standing.

After being released, Scott dismissed the felony rioting charges against her, telling the Journal they are “ridiculous” and “absurd.”

“The main library is in my District 41 — what I have done nothing but fight for in Frankfort and try to get funding for — and you’re going to accuse me of trying to set fire to it?” she asked. “That’s ridiculous. It’s absurd.”

The Democrat claimed she was targeted by police as she was trying to cross the street to a Unitarian church giving sanctuary to protesters.

Fellow Democratic state Rep. Josie Raymond took to Twitter to play the victim card, accusing police of trying to “silence” the “loudest voices fighting racial injustice.”

The head of AFSCME Local 3425, which represents library workers, came to Scott’s defense in a Facebook post early Friday morning.

“We have heard that State Representative Attica Scott and other peaceful protestors have been accused by LMPD of vandalism of the Main Library, among other charges,” President Ashley Nichole Sims and Vice President Val Pfister said in a statement.

“Representative Scott has consistently been a vocal supporter of libraries and library workers and has been an ally specifically to our union through many battles,” the union leaders continued. “We have seen no proof that the flare thrown into the library has done any major damage, nor that Representative Scott had anything to do with it, and find these accusations inconsistent with her character and the constant support we have received from her.”

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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