Minneapolis City Council, that dismantled the force, scared of crime surge, asking ‘Where are the police?’

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Residents of Minneapolis are learning a hard, first-hand lesson that elections have consequences.

With violent crime surging in the city after the recent Black Lives Matter riots, the same Minneapolis City Council that officially moved to dismantle its police force is now asking, “Where are the police?”


 

At a meeting slated as a study session on police reform, which was attended by Police Chief Medaria Arradondo, Minnesota Public Radio reported that newly elected council member Jamal Osman said, “Residents are asking, ‘Where are the police’?”

Perhaps the question should be, given the council’s plans, “Where is the Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention?”

“That is the only public safety option they have at the moment. MPD. They rely on MPD. And they are saying they are nowhere to be seen,” Osman said, in reference to the Minneapolis Police Department.

Other council members said their constituents are feeling “terrorized.”

As seen in one Democrat-run city after another following the protests and riots over the death of George Floyd, which left police departments under siege, the city is now dealing with a crime wave.

More from MPR News:

The number of reported violent crimes, like assaults, robberies and homicides are up compared to 2019, according to MPD crime data. More people have been killed in the city in the first nine months of 2020 than were slain in all of last year. Property crimes, like burglaries and auto thefts, are also up. Incidents of arson have increased 55 percent over the total at this point in 2019.

 

It’s not clear if the rise in arson includes when rioters nearly burned the city to the ground.

Council President Lisa Bender, who led the call to dismantle the MPD, said that her constituents are claiming defiant officers admit that they’re purposely not arresting people who are committing crimes, the news outlet reported.

Always on the attack, Bender added, “This is not new, but it is very concerning in the current context.”

All four police officers involved in the arrest of Floyd — whose death may have been the result of a fentanyl overdose — were fired. They also face serious charges for the incident. Derek Chauvin, who had his knee on Floyd’s neck, faces a second-degree murder charge, while the other officers face charges of aiding and abetting second-degree murder.

It goes without saying that Minneapolis cops were paying attention, because they’re fleeing the department like rats jumping from a sinking ship — the chief said around 100 officers have left or have taken leave since the beginning of 2020, which is more than double the usual number.

The public health-based approach the council is pushing is apparently slow to be implemented.

As MPR News noted, the council recently took over $1 million from the police budget to hire “violence interrupters” to intervene and defuse potentially violent incidents.

“If we have these systems in place we are getting ahead of the violence,” council member Phillipe Cunningham said. “That’s why I’ve advocated so strongly for the violence interrupters, because if they are interrupting the violence before the guns are being fired, then the MPD doesn’t have to respond to that violence.”

If the reaction on social media is any indication, Minnesotans may be waking up to the reality that who you elect to office can make a difference.

Here’s a sampling of responses from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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