Powered by Topple

Navy investigating SEAL event featuring military dogs attacking ‘target’ wearing Kaepernick jersey

Powered by Topple

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE.


U.S. Navy officials said Sunday the service has launched an investigation into a SEAL event featuring military dogs that attacked a male “target” who was wearing a jersey featuring former quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s name and number.

“Colin Kaepernick stand in Josh gets attacked by 5 Navy SEAL dogs for not standing during the National Anthem at a Navy SEAL Museum fundraiser,” said a now-deleted Instagram post featuring video of the ‘attack,’ the New York Post reported.

The video was initially posted in January 2019 but it just came to the Navy’s attention Sunday, the Naval Special Warfare Command noted in a tweet.

“The inherent message of this video is completely inconsistent with the values and ethos of Naval Special Warfare and the U.S. Navy,” the statement said.

 

The command is in charge of all Navy special operations units, to include the vaunted SEAL teams.

“We are investigating the matter fully, and initial indications are that there were no active duty Navy personnel or equipment involved with this independent organization’s event.’’

Kaepernick is responsible for launching the NFL’s kneeling controversy back in 2016 to protest alleged serial abuses of black men by police. Since then, the gesture has spread to virtually every other professional sport.

This year in particular, sports leagues have adopted racial justice messaging in line with the Marxist-inspired Black Lives Matter movement, and scores of players have either knelt during the playing of the national anthem or left the venue for the locker room.

The man who was ‘attacked’ at the SEAL museum event is wearing a torn No. 7 red-and-white jersey with “Kaepernick” on the back. He is bitten on his arms by the training dogs while wearing a protective suit specially made for training attack dogs.

The museum is located in Fort Pierce, Fla. The non-profit center “shares the legacy of the world’s premier special operations force,’’ its website notes.

As protests and rioting raged following the George Floyd incident in May, the sports media issued calls for an NFL team to sign Kaepernick, though he hasn’t played in the league since 2017. At 32 and without any recent playing experience, however, that’s not an enticing proposition for teams, even those struggling at the quarterback position.

“If Roger Goodell Is Serious, Then He Needs To Get Colin Kaepernick Back In The NFL Now,” said a Forbes headline in early June.

“Dear NFL: Give Colin Kaepernick His Job Back, Then We’ll Talk,” a Sports Illustrated headline noted.

“Opinion: NFL Has A Chance To Be On Right Side of History. Bring Kaepernick Back,” the Cincinnati Enquirer noted.

“Now Is The Moment To Sign Colin Kaepernick,” CNN declared.

“I don’t know if the NFL owes him anything, but he at least deserves an opportunity to play football if he wants to,” retired Hall of Famer Warren Moon, one of the league’s first black quarterbacks, told TMZ.

NFL Commissioner tacitly supported Kaepernick’s return to the sport in a mid-June interview.

“If he wants to resume his career in the NFL, then it’s gonna take a team to make that decision,” Goodell told ESPN. “I welcome that, support a club making that decision and encourage them to do that.

“If his efforts are not on the field but continuing to work in this [social justice] space, we welcome him to that table and to help us, guide us, help us make better decisions about the kinds of things that need to be done in the communities. We have invited him in before,” he added.

Jon Dougherty

Comments

Latest Articles