Texas county commissioners vote unanimously to keep Confederate monument outside courthouse

Kaylee Greenlee, DCNF

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

A Confederate statue will remain on a Texas county courthouse lawn, commissioners voted unanimously Thursday.

Parker County Judge Pat Deen said county documents did not provide any evidence that the statue had ever been officially owned by the county, the Forth Worth Star-Telegram reported. Deen said the statue is actually property of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. United Daughters of the Confederacy was founded in Nashville in 1894 and seeks to preserve the history of the Confederate States, according to its website.

“We went through all the minutes from the court, starting back from roughly 1901 to 1950. In that time period, there has never been a motion made by the court to ever accept the Confederate statue, as you see out there,” Parker County Attorney John Forrest said, the Star-Telegram reported.

Commissioner George Conley made a motion to “leave the monument where it has been for over 100 years and get on with whatever happens after that,” the Star-Telegram reported.

Commissioner Larry Walden seconded Conley’s motion, leading to a unanimous vote of the five-member commission in favor of leaving the monument alone, the Star-Telegram reported. 

Commissioners said several constituents wanted to leave the statue, the Star-Telegram reported.

Confederate statues have been torn down across the nation. Some have been removed by demonstrators, such as a Confederate statue in Portsmouth, Virginia, the Daily Caller News Foundation reported. In other instances, some institutions such as the University of Mississippi have voted to remove the statues.

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