Dr. Fauci’s first pitch of MLB opener mocked for being as ‘on point as his covid assessment’

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci made a grand appearance Thursday at Major League Baseball’s controversial Opening Day game between the Washington Nationals and New York Yankees.

Following in the steps of disgraced former FBI Director James Comey, who became an entertainment industry darling after his ouster in 2017, Fauci, who – luckily for him – still remains in the administration (for now), showed up to throw the first pitch.

Watch:

Objectively speaking, it was terrible.

But as noted by a large swath of social media critics, the pitch was no less terrible than his habitually wrong coronavirus statements and predictions.

Look:

Note what the latter Twitter user wrote about Fauci pitching “to the left.” It was a jab based on how most of his false coronavirus statements and predictions have been readily embraced by members of the political left.

Likewise, members of the left have propped him up as a folk hero, whereas members of the right have chosen to view him with a more critical eye. This is a point that contrarian left-wing comedian Bill Maher tried to convey back in May.

“Look, I think Dr. Fauci is smart, honorable and sincere, but I also thought about that about Robert Mueller. And I worry liberals are once again falling into the same trap of lionizing someone just because they’re the anti-Trump,” he tried warning his fellow liberals at the time.

As an example of why lionizing him was a bad idea, Maher pointed to how Fauci had said in late January that the coronavirus was “a very, very low risk to the United States. It isn’t something the American people needs to worry about or be frightened about.'”

“On January 23rd, Trump got a briefing from U.S. intelligence, and he claims they underplayed the danger then. But the New York Times points out that ‘Trump ignored a host of warnings the received around that time from high ranking officials, epidemiologists, scientists, bio-defense officials, other national security aides and the news media about the virus’s growing threat,'” Maher said.

But if that was true, what did it say about Fauci?

“So all those people knew it was a threat by then, but Dr. Fauci was saying ‘very, very low risk?’” the host noted.

Exactly. And there are more examples just like it.

“In March, Fauci told ’60 Minutes’ there’s no reason to be walking around with a mask, but there was, and he is now,” Maher continued. “That month he also said if you want to go on a cruise ship, go on a cruise ship.”

Listen to Maher’s scathing indictment of Fauci below:

This isn’t to say Fauci’s a bad guy or a left-wing zealot (though he does have some left-wing sensibilities), but rather that he’s not some infallible genius, and his judgment calls alone shouldn’t be used to decide the country’s path forward.

Like Trump administration trade official Peter Navarro pointed out in a column earlier this month, “When you ask me whether I listen to his advice, my answer is only with skepticism and caution.” Versus with blind sycophancy.

Indeed. There’s a reason why some governors — mainly Democrat ones — rushed to bend the knee when Fauci recommended a national shutdown/lockdown in the spring and some governors — mainly Republican ones — said no thanks.

And there’s a reason why, months later, researchers have since found that lockdowns and other such actions “were not associated with statistically significant reductions in the number of critical cases or overall mortality” as it pertains to the coronavirus.

Science is rarely a black and white issue. It’s usually nuanced and complicated, which is why the words and “wisdom” of one man alone should not be used to dictate policy. Nor should one man alone be deemed to be the arbiter of truth.

Baseball, on the other hand, is a bit different, in that if you want to know how to throw a pitch correctly, it isn’t necessary to scour the world in search of the truth. All you gotta do, in fact, is turn to one man — President Donald Trump, to be exact:

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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