Abandoned by local leaders, grieving father of son killed in ‘CHOP’ gets a call … from Trump

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The father of the teen who was shot and killed at the edge of the Seattle CHOP zone was surprised by a personal call from President Trump.

On the day of the funeral for his 19-year-old son who was shot in the lawless area near the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest last month, Horace Lorenzo Anderson received a condolence call from the president which he much appreciated.


(Source: KCPQ-TV)

Anderson acknowledged that Trump “did not have to” give him a call but told KCPQ-TV that it meant a lot that he did, noting that he had still not heard from Seattle’s Democratic Mayor Jenny Durkan.

“I still ain’t heard from the mayor,” the father told the news outlet.

“Incredibly, Donald Trump called me,” he added. “The president of the United States called me today and talked to me today.”

“What did he say?” KCPQ reporter Matt Lorch asked.

“He gave his condolences, and, me I’m not a political guy,” he added, saying he was “real” and told the president that he wasn’t liked.

“I said, nobody like you, but in this camera, I’ll tell you right now, Donald Trump called me, and he didn’t have to call me, he didn’t have to do nothing!” Anderson said.

Anderson’s friend and family spokesman Andre Taylor told Fox News that the phone call “blew Horace’s mind.”

“We just talked to the president of the United States,” he said. “How are you going to top that?”

Taylor, who appeared with Anderson on his emotional Fox News interview on Wednesday night, explained that Trump had seen the distraught father’s heartbreaking appearance on “Hannity.”

“He said he watched ‘Hannity’ last night, and told Horace, ‘Your son is looking down on you and watching over you,’” Taylor said of the call that lasted about seven minutes. “He was incredibly gracious, and it gave Horace some extra help as he buried his son.”

The grieving father had expressed his anger with Seattle government officials and law enforcement nearly two weeks after the death of his son, Horace Lorenzo Anderson Jr., relating how he had still not heard from anyone, including the mayor.

Anderson Jr., who died from multiple gunshot wounds, according to the King County Medical Examiner’s Office, was shot just after 2 a.m. on June 20 at the edge of the CHOP zone but police reportedly could not get to him in the area.

“They need to come talk to me and somebody needs to come tell me something, because I still don’t know nothing,” Anderson told host Sean Hannity in the more than 30-minute interview. “Somebody needs to come to my house and knock on my door and tell me something. I don’t know nothing. All I know is my son got killed up there.”

Breaking down in tears, Anderson’s description of the agonizing realization that he wouldn’t see his son again made Hannity visibly emotional as well.

Hundreds reportedly showed up Thursday at the funeral home in Kent for an emotional service for the teen. His father told KCPQ how he has been unable to sleep at night since the tragedy.

“I haven’t been able to sleep. I wake up in the middle of the night. I go look for him. He ain’t there,” the father said.

“My son, he needed help,” he added, expressing frustration over the occupied protest zone which delayed aid to his son as ambulances were unable to get to him that night due to the danger and the crowds.

“And they shouldn’t be picking kids up and throwing them in their trunk and taking them to the hospital. The paramedics should have been there. The police should have been there,” he added, referring to the volunteer medics who rushed Anderson Jr. to the hospital.

The president had repeatedly condemned the takeover of the downtown Seattle area which city officials referred to as “peaceful,” saying the National Guard should be used to clear out the autonomous zone. After the shootings and when protesters showed up outside of the mayor’s house, she appeared to finally take action.

Dozens of protesters were arrested after refusing to leave once the police were given the order to clear out the area, dismantling the physical barricades and forcibly moving out any holdouts.

Unfortunately for Anderson, though the funeral for his son and a call from the president has offered some solace, there is still no closure as he awaits any information from police and city officials on what happened that night.

 

Frieda Powers

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

Originally from New York, Powers graduated from New York University and eventually made her way to sunny South Florida where she has been writing for the BizPacReview team since 2015.
Frieda Powers

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