Chris Wallace presses BLM leader to explain beef with America and ‘burn it down’ comment

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Hawk Newsome, an extremist who heads the Greater New York branch of the Black Lives Matter movement, reappeared on Fox News this Sunday to address the incendiary remarks he’d made last Wednesday to FNC host Martha MacCallum.

“If this country doesn’t give us what we want, then we will burn down this system,” he’d bluntly said during that appearance.

Speaking with Newsome four days later, Chris Wallace, anchor of “Fox News Sunday,” asked point-blank, “What do you accomplish with rhetoric like that? How do you think that helps?”

Watch the discussion that ensued below:


(Source: Fox News)

In a tone far more congenial than the one he’d had for MacCallum, Newsome replied by stating that he’s from the streets, and thus he’s merely echoing the sentiments of the streets.

I live in the Bronx, I live amongst the people,” he said. “So it’s not like I’m sitting here pushing a button. But if people keep seeing these images of their babies, of their babies, of black people being killed, if they keep dealing with financial inequality and inequity, it reaches a point of frustration and people lash out. This is a matter of inevitability that people will lash out because they’re feeling like they’re backed into a corner.”

While the majority of black deaths occur at the hands of black criminals, Newsome was speaking specifically about the extremely rare phenomenon of black criminal suspects being unjustifiably killed by the police.

As for the issues of “financial inequality and inequity,” they’re the result of poor personal responsibility, as the tweets below demonstrate:

Wallace wasn’t satisfied with Newsome’s answer, in part because he was aware of the extremist’s formerly moderate views.

“But just two years ago, back in 2018, you gave a TED Talk in which you preached nonviolence and talked about how, during the riots in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray, you tried to stop the violence,” he said. “What happened?”

Newsome replied with a lengthy spiel about so-called “systemic inequality” and about how the entire American system of governance needs to be changed. In other words, he responded with extremist rhetoric.

What I’m talking about is systemic inequality,” he said. “What I’m talking about is America treating crime as something that needs to be handled with policing instead of defunding the police and looking at crime from the perspective that it’s a health crisis.”

The same way we looked at heroin addiction when it was only black people as tough on drugs, war on crime, and when it became white people we looked at it as a public health crisis, as something that needs to be treated. That’s the way we need to look at crime.”

Heroin addiction is an arguably victim-less crime. Conversely, stealing from others, vandalizing others’ property, burning down others’ businesses, raping others, molesting others and killing others aren’t victim-less crimes.

Moreover, of all the races in America, blacks commit the most interracial crime, with blacks having committed nearly 550,000 crimes on whites in 2018, and whites having committed only about 60,000 crimes on blacks, as an example.

(Source: International Business Times)

“You think about police, over 80 percent of the calls are not violent felonies,” Newsome added. “Therefore, we should really look into why police are being called.”

Non-violent crimes can include shoplifting, theft, burglary, robbery and vandalism. Despite being non-violent, these crimes still involve victims.

Look at the causes of why people are committing crimes: They are desperate, they’re poor, they’re under-educated and they are left out to dry by this American system of government,” Newsome continued.

So if you want to decrease crime, you don’t hire police to come in and arrest everybody and brutalize people. If you want to lower crime, you must invest in people, you must give people jobs. You must make people employable.”

In other words, when people suffer from the consequences of their own poor personal decision-making, it’s contingent on the government to solve their problems for them. This is a central tenet of Marxism … not surprisingly.

“Places with the highest murder rates have the highest rates of unemployment, so let’s start talking about entrepreneurship programs in our community,” he added. “Let’s start talking about schools that actually meet the needs of people. That’s something we can do.”

Apparently satisfied with Newsome’s answer, Wallace then turned the conversation to the ongoing toppling of Confederate statues and asked why BLM extremists aren’t pursuing the removal of these statues the normal and legal way as Martin Luther King Jr. would have no doubt done and congressional Democrats are currently trying to do.

Newsome replied by saying that while he respects King, he doesn’t agree with his tactics, in part because he and his peers don’t trust anyone in the Democrat establishment.

“What we have to understand is black people do not trust politicians. They don’t trust Democrats, they don’t trust Republicans. Black people also have a problem with the government overstepping its bounds. The biggest manifestation of that is policing,” he said.

If you talk about the rift in the civil rights movement, our elders, a lot of them have been bought off by the Democratic establishment. Right? And they pretty much go with the flow of the Democratic establishment.”

He added that the establishment “has failed us, the government spends too much money on failing programs. The government is beholden to corporations, right? You look at Wells Fargo right, and how they paid out a billion dollars in settlements for discriminatory practices but they got bailouts from Obama and they got bailouts from Trump during COVID. You look at how this country is beholden to corporations and people feel betrayed.”

The discussion concluded immediately after the latter remarks.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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