Chicago activist wants to know where BLM is amid wave of deadly street violence: ‘Makes no sense’

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A Chicago-based community activist working to minimize gun violence called the Black Lives Matter movement out for being absent in that battle.

Then again, there’s little about that effort that helps the Democratic Party on election day.

Tio Hardiman, the executive director for Violence Interrupters, appeared Thursday on Fox News’ “The Story” to say he gets the concerns about police brutality, but there’s “a lot of work in our own backyard.”


(Source: Fox News)

His appearance followed another bloody weekend in Chicago, with over a hundred people shot and a 3-year-old was among those slain.

The segment was set up by showing the remarks of the president of the Greater New York Black Lives Matter chapter saying “if this country doesn’t give us what we want, then we will burn down this system.”

Hardiman told host Martha MacCallum that he would like to meet with the leaders of Black Lives Matter.

“It makes no sense to me if we continue to stand up against the system, but we will not stand up in our own neighborhood,” he said.

“We need to really do a lot of work in our own backyard right now in order to … stem the tide of violence — gun violence has taken so many lives here in Chicago, Baltimore and Philadelphia,” Hardiman noted.

“I’m one of the guys that was on the frontline when it came down to standing up against police brutality and excessive force,” he said. “And I understand where Black Lives Matter, what they’re attempting to do. I understand that. But at the same time, we need help to do our best to stop gun violence in Chicago. The entire nation should be outraged when a three-year-old is executed on the streets of Chicago and a 13-year-old young girl was killed on the west side [of] Chicago as well.”

With the media successfully establishing as fact the narrative that racially-motivated police brutality is rampant in America, even though recent statistics fail to bear this out, BLM has exploded into a powerful political movement, and Hardiman took note of the money flowing in.

“Black Lives Matter, they’re raising millions and millions of dollars,” Hardiman added. “We should have a meeting and see how we can actually work together in order to stem the tide of gun violence in the inner city.”

MacCallum asked her guest what he would like to see change.

“I mean for example, when George Floyd was murdered, I will say that, everybody began to rise up, take to the streets all over the nation,” Hardiman said. “This 3-year-old that was killed, if people know who the killer is, they should go to his house. Loot his house and take his gym shoes from him. Burn his house and take his Xbox from him the same way that they were protesting in Chicago, all over the United States.”

“I understand the need to protest police brutality and excessive force, I’m with that,” he added. “But at the same time, we are losing too many kids due to senseless acts of gun violence. So my call to action for Black Lives Matter: We need to have a meeting so we can see how we can organize and unify together.”

 

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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