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‘Still very offensive’: The Dixie Chicks ‘woke’ name change is a big backfire

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Country music band The Dixie Chicks has become the latest entertainment act to become more ‘politically correct’ in the age of perpetual outrage and virtue-signaling to the Black Lives Matter movement.

However, the name they settled on — simply, “The Chicks” — has already raised some eyebrows as well, with some accusing the three-girl band’s new name of being “sexist.”

The site Pitchfork notes:

The band revealed the change with the branding for its new song “March March.” The Chicks have also amended the cover of their comeback album Gaslighter to reflect the new name. In addition, the band’s social media pages and website now refer to the trio as the Chicks.

The name change comes on the heels of a Variety column written by Jeremy Helligar that criticized the ‘Dixie’ in Dixie Chicks as somehow being tone-deaf in an era where Leftists and Marxists are working to cancel America’s culture as it has existed for centuries and replace it with a revisionist model that censors and punishes dissent.

Noting that lead singer Natalie Maines cost the group notoriety and much of its fan base after claiming band members were “ashamed” the then-president of the United States George W. Bush “is from Texas,” Helligar noted, “The grand irony of the hoopla that ensued was that as she stood on stage declaring herself a non-fan of George W. Bush, the Republican president, she and her bandmates, sisters Martie Maguire and Emily Strayer, were performing under a moniker that, in some ways, represents up-with-whiteness more flagrantly than Bush, whom Kanye West once accused of not caring about Black people, ever did.”

His solution, of course, was that the band must bend their knees and change their name — which is what they did.

Maines & Co. aren’t the only country band to be targeted by the ‘woke’ BLM crowd. Earlier this month, the three-member group Lady Antebellum said they were changing their name to Lady A., because ‘antebellum’ allegedly conjured up images of the Old South — the pre-Confederacy period as well as slavery.

But their name-change decision didn’t work out so famously; the group was slammed by a Seattle-based blues singer and black woman who has used “Lady A” as the name of her act for years.

And in 2019, well-known country band Confederate Railroad was also targeted by ‘wokeness,’ though unsuccessfully. Even as Confederate monuments were either coming down or being torn down, band members said they would never change the name of their group, even after venues in New York, Illinois, and other places canceled their concert appearances.

“The Illinois Department of Agriculture has removed Confederate Railroad from our 2019 Du Quoin State Fair Grandstand lineup. While every artist has a right to expression, we believe this decision is in the best interest of serving all of the people in our state,” Illinois State Fair manager Josh Gross said in a statement in July 2019.

Band lead singer Danny Shirley said the group has used the same name for 30 years and had no plans to change it now.

Other venues stepped up to book the band as a way to show their support.

Meanwhile, the name change for The Chicks was widely panned on social media, including one who called it ‘ridiculously sexist.’

Jon Dougherty

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