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Pence’s Nat Security advisor rips ‘fraud’ and ‘liar’ John Bolton as the Benedict Arnold of our time

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Vice President Mike Pence’s national security advisor slammed John Bolton as a “Benedict Arnold” who will go down in history for his “duplicitous” actions.

Ret. Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg accused President Trump’s former national security adviser of “self-serving” behavior with the upcoming publication of his tell-all book, “The Room Where It Happened,” telling Fox Business host Lou Dobbs how Bolton frequently created issues in the administration when he worked there before being ousted last fall.


(Source: Fox Business Network)

“Let me tell you a little bit about John Bolton,” Kellogg said on “Lou Dobbs Tonight” Friday, delivering a scathing commentary as he addressed the Department of Justice lawsuit to delay publication of his book.

“I think John Bolton is going to go down in history as the Benedict Arnold of national security advisors to the president of the United States,” he added. “I’ve never seen anything like what he has done. I think he’s duplicitous at best, self-serving, and I think at times he comes across as an absolute fraud and a liar.”

Kellogg noted that because he has been with the Trump administration since its beginning, he has “had an opportunity to be involved in every single national security discussion and event that we’ve had since President Trump has been in office.”

He noted that while Trump has always been “very forceful” and “direct,” as well as “candid” with heads of state and leaders, the president’s “America first” view, is “something John Bolton hasn’t done.”

Kellogg told Dobbs he saw Bolton “personally derail the Afghan peace talks” last year.

“Because of that, we’re a year behind what we were trying to do in stopping the longest war in American history,” he said. “I saw him twice, on two different occasions, nearly get us involved in a shooting war in the Middle East that the president had to tamp down because he was given erroneous information from that-time national security advisor, John Bolton.”

Kellogg also accused Bolton of trying to derail talks with North Korea by raising the “disaster” known as the “Libya model,” as well as saying he “undercut” Trump’s efforts to withdraw U.S. troops in Afghanistan by “not really giving the truth on what was happening when working with…Taliban leadership.”

“Yes, the president hired him, the president fired him too,” Kellogg said of Bolton.

“You believe, without question, that he is then a traitor to the United States government?” Dobbs asked.

Though Kellogg responded that he “would never go that far,” he did assert that Bolton “was not a good fit” for the administration.

“In fact, I’d be surprised if anybody wanted frankly to hire him as a dogcatcher,” he said, noting he was probably insulting dogcatchers by saying that. “He’s just not a good fit. He always has, Lou, his own agenda, what he wants to get accomplished regardless of what everybody else is trying to do out there,” he added.

Dobbs slammed Bolton for his ingratitude to Trump, selling out by retaliating with a book deal reportedly worth $2 million.

“It’s not a very nice way to say thanks for bringing him into the administration and giving him an opportunity to serve the nation,” the Fox Business host noted.

Kellogg agreed, saying Bolton arrived in the administration “under false pretenses.”

“He came here saying he would do certain things, he would support the president and the entire time he worked to go a different direction from where the president wanted to take this nation. And he would do it subtly. He’s a good bureaucratic in-fighter, and he knew how to do it. And the president finally said, enough, I’m done with this guy,” Kellogg said.

“He brought him in, because the president likes to have diversity of opinion. When the president brings you into a room, he asks everybody in that room their opinion on what we should do. Everybody has a voice in that room, and then he makes the decision,” he explained.

“John was always pushing against the president, always trying to develop a course of action that we knew the president didn’t want to go through,” Kellogg recalled. “Finally the president said, enough, I don’t need this anymore, thank you very much, you’re gone.”

Frieda Powers

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