Morale hits bottom, Minneapolis cops walk off job

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE.


With morale hitting rock bottom, cops on the beleaguered Minneapolis police force are starting to quit, with at least 14 of them already resigned or on the way out.

Other offices have reportedly even walked off the job without filing paperwork.

Demonized for racism and police brutality as a result of the misconduct of a relatively few bad cops, and being left out to dry by elected officials, officers on Minnesota’s largest police force in the state’s largest city are turning in their badges.

With guilt by association gaining currency, one retired officer told the Star Tribune that “They don’t feel appreciated. Everybody hates the police right now. I mean everybody.”

The news outlet asserted that the getaway from the already-undermanned law enforcement agency is unprecedented:

“The departures, an unusually large exodus, come amid a growing crisis for the state’s largest police force, with a state human rights investigation underway, calls for defunding, and even disbandment.

“Morale has sunk to new lows in recent weeks, say department insiders, as officers reported feeling misunderstood and squeezed by all sides: by the state probe; by protesters, who hurled bricks and epithets their way; by city leaders, who surrendered a police station that later burned on national television, and by the media. Numerous officers and protesters were injured in the rioting.”

As alluded to above. seven officers have already left, with another seven putting in their separation paperwork, the Star Tribune noted. A few were convinced to stay, at least for now. And according to a deputy chief, others have simply left without notifying HR.

About 75 cops on the force that currently totals 850 are already eligible for full retirement benefits, so it seems unlikely that many of them will hang around much longer.

In most jurisdictions, cops can cash out with their maximum lifetime pension after 20 or 25 years of service.

A department spokesman claimed that the resignations would leave public safety unaffected, but given the civil unrest in Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd in police custody, a horrific incident that was universally condemned by law enforcement and the general public along with lawmakers, that’s debatable.

The indefensible officer in the Floyd case is facing a charge of murder and three other cops on the scene also face criminal charges.

A once sought-after career especially for those with military experience, recruiting new officers into police work under these politicized circumstances could also be adversely affected.

While insisting that law enforcement is biased against minorities, Charles Johnson, the president of the National Association of Black Law Enforcement officers, asserted that “it’s only a few of the 700,000 police officers across the country who are idiots, and don’t know how to treat people with dignity and respect.”

Pandering to the extremist mob, the Minneapolis city council has begun the process of defunding the police in favor of a so-called community-based public safety system.

During the height of the riots, far-left Mayor Jacob Frey abandoning a police precinct house that wound up being torched by street thugs and Antifa radicals, a decision which did nothing to suggest that the city was standing behind its officers on the street.

Second thoughts about law enforcement as a career are likely being played out across the country in particularly violent and politically charged areas where cops have concluded the high-risk profession is just not worth it anymore.

For example, Tulsa PD Major Travis Yates, with 27 years on the job, is warning of an oncoming police exodus. “You aren’t going to have to abolish the police, we won’t be around for it,” he declared.

 

Powered by Topple

Robert Jonathan

Comments

Latest Articles