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Don Lemon mocks Trump officials denying systemic racism in US: ‘white-mansplaining …we do not need their permission’

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Far-left CNN commentator Don Lemon appears to believe his skin color entitles him to dismiss facts — or what he’s dubbed “white-mansplaining” — as they pertain to the myth of so-called systemic racism in law enforcement.

White men denying the existence of systemic racism — that is the essence of white entitlement,” he said Wednesday evening after playing a clip of various White House officials denying the existence of systemic racism in law enforcement.

We do not need their permission or their sign-off on what we know to be true. And what we have lived. That is white-mansplaining.”

Listen to his irrational rant below (disable your adblocker if the video doesn’t appear):

“How can you solve this problem, this systemic racism that is killing people of color, if you won’t even admit there’s a problem? First step is admitting there’s a problem,” he added.

“America knows which way the wind is blowing. Even NASCAR is banning Confederate flags right now because people, including one of their own drivers, spoke up loud and clear.”

Lemon’s remarks were chockablock with so much irrationality that it’d likely take a book just to debunk everything. Nevertheless …

That systemic racism doesn’t exist in law enforcement isn’t “white-mansplaining” — it’s a fact, and if anything, Lemon’s refusal to acknowledge this fact could fairly be construed as “black-mansplaining.”

Here are some more facts.

One: Black people appear to commit the majority of all crime in America. They therefore interact with the police more than members of any other race. This has been true for years.

“Today blacks are about 13 percent of the population and continue to be responsible for an inordinate amount of crime,” Jason L. Riley of the Manhattan Institute noted in his 2014 book, “Please Stop Helping Us.”

“Between 1976 and 2005 blacks com­mitted more than half of all murders in the United States. The black arrest rate for most offenses — including robbery, aggravated assault and property crimes — is still typically two to three times their representation in the population. Blacks as a group are also overrepresented among persons arrested for so-called white-collar crimes such as counterfeiting, fraud and embezzlement.”

Two: Because blacks interact with the police more than members of any other race, they naturally suffer the most quantities of police brutality, according to award-winning intellectual Heather Mac Donald of the Manhattan Institute.

Writing in The Wall Street Journal last week, she noted that a study published last August in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences had found “that the more frequently officers encounter violent suspects from any given racial group, the greater the chance that a member of that group will be fatally shot by a police officer.”

This isn’t proof of racism but rather of the fact that more criminal behavior breeds more police encounters and thus a higher chance of bad police encounters.

Three: According to researchers from the University of Michigan and University of Maryland, “officers are less likely to fatally shoot black civilians for fear of public and legal reprisals,” meaning therefore that, “all else equal, this would increase the likelihood that a person fatally shot was white vs. black.”

Four: “A 2015 Justice Department analysis of the Philadelphia Police Department found that white police officers were less likely than black or Hispanic officers to shoot unarmed black suspects,” according to Mac Donald.

Five: “[A] police officer is 18½ times more likely to be killed by a black male than an unarmed black male is to be killed by a police officer,” according to Mac Donald.

Six: In 2016, Harvard University economist Roland Fryer released a study that showed there to be no evidence of bias in police shootings.

Do these facts negate the existence of police brutality? Absolutely not. But they make it clear police brutality is the byproduct of bad policing, not racism, and that the black community’s disproportionate encounters with bad cops is the byproduct of the black community’s disproportionate committing of crime. These are the facts.

The irony is that Lemon’s rhetoric was inspired by the killing of Minneapolis black man George Floyd, despite there being no evidence Floyd’s death had been motivated by racism. Unless an officer having his knee on someone’s neck or back constitutes racism, in which case a discussion about systemic racism against whites is also warranted:

But far-left commentators like Don Lemon don’t appear to care an iota about any of these facts, ergo why they remain forever obsessed with pushing a false narrative about racist cops literally hunting down black men, women and children.

It’s a false narrative — a dangerous one, to boot.

“The false narrative of systemic police bias resulted in targeted killings of officers during the Obama presidency,” Mac Donald wrote for the Journal. “The pattern may be repeating itself. Officers are being assaulted and shot at while they try to arrest gun suspects or respond to the growing riots.”

“Police precincts and courthouses have been destroyed with impunity, which will encourage more civilization-destroying violence. If the Ferguson effect of officers backing off law enforcement in minority neighborhoods is reborn as the Minneapolis effect, the thousands of law-abiding African-Americans who depend on the police for basic safety will once again be the victims.”

Law-abiding African-Americans like David Dorn, Dave Patrick Underwood and countless others, all of whom have been ignored by race hustlers like Lemon who think their race entitles them to ignore the facts.

Sorry, Mr. Lemon, but the facts don’t care about your race or feelings.

Vivek Saxena

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