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Kayleigh McEnany says Trump is considering executive order on police reform

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With the Black Lives Matter riots stirring the nation, following the death of George Floyd, President Donald Trump is expected to get out in front of the pandering from the Democratic Party on police reform.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Wednesday during a Fox News interview the president is considering an executive order to address the issue.

Citing other sources, Fox News reported that Trump “will soon have a list of police reform proposals that can be accomplished through a combination of executive and legislative action — and that the effort could have some crossover with Democratic proposals.”

 

“There’s been tremendous work done on this and a lot of progress over the last few days,” McEnany said.

“The president has been reviewing proposals,” she noted.

McEnany noted that White House chief of staff Mark Meadows went to Capitol Hill, along with adviser Jared Kushner and domestic policy adviser Ja’Ron Smith, on Tuesday to meet with Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C.

Without offering specifics, McEnany added, “We do believe that we’ll have proactive policy prescriptions, whether that means legislation or an executive order.”

The Washington Times reported that the president could announce action Thursday when he travels to Dallas, Texas, to meet with faith leaders, law enforcement officials and small-business owners.

Trump took the lead on criminal justice reform when he signed bipartisan legislation in 2018 that affected sentencing guidelines and the treatment of federal prisoners.

More on that effort from Fox News:

The First Step Act would give federal judges more leeway when sentencing some drug offenders and boost prisoner rehabilitation efforts. It also would reduce life sentences for some drug offenders with three convictions, or “three strikes,” to 25 years. Another provision would allow about 2,600 federal prisoners sentenced for crack cocaine offenses before August 2010 the opportunity to petition for a reduced penalty.

It also incentivizes prisoners to participate in programs designed to reduce the risk of recidivism, with the reward being an earlier release to either home confinement or a halfway house to complete their sentence. This will not be made available to offenders who were also convicted of violent firearms offenses, sexual exploitation of children or high-level heroin and fentanyl dealing.

 

Speaker Nancy Pelosi led a group of Democrats sporting traditional African kente cloth in kneeling in the U.S. Capitol — although the 80-year-old speaker needed help getting up.

The political theater coming just before the party unveiled sweeping police reform legislation.

https://twitter.com/thejtlewis/status/1270199012033994753?s=20

The measure would ban any type of chokehold, as well as no-knock warrants in drug cases. It also seeks to end qualified immunity, which gives cops broad immunity from civil lawsuits.

With an eye on November and lots of uncertainty over how much support President Trump has among black voters, House Democrats are certain to pass the legislation.

At the same time, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., tapped Sen. Scott, the only black Republican in the Senate, to head up a group of GOP senators drafting police reform legislation.

Saying “time is of the essence,” Scott expects to see something produced soon.

“I think it’s important for this nation to take a very powerful stand and position that says we’re listening we’re hearing, and we’re reacting, we’re responding in a positive, constructive manner,” he said.

Tom Tillison

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