Washington Post retracts its claim that Trump used George Floyd’s name to tout amazing job gains

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Editors at the Washington Post have done something they rarely do — they’ve corrected the paper’s record for getting a report wrong regarding President Donald Trump.

On Friday, the president used the opportunity during a bill-signing ceremony at the White House to tout historic job-growth numbers in May. As states began reopening due to a receding coronavirus outbreak, 2.1 million Americans were either called back to their old jobs or found new ones, as the unemployment rate tanked to 13.3 percent.

During his remarks, the president mentioned George Floyd, the black Minneapolis man who recently died at the hands of police, sparking nationwide protests and destructive riots.

“Equal justice under the law must mean that every American receives equal treatment in every encounter with law enforcement regardless of race, color, gender, or creed. They have to receive fair treatment from law enforcement. They have to receive it,” Trump said at one point.

“We all saw what happened last week. We can’t let that happen. Hopefully, George is looking down right now and saying this is a great thing happening for our country. This is a great day for him, it’s a great day for everybody. This is a great day for everybody. This is a great, great day,” he added.

Leftist media outlets and talking heads, as well as congressional Democrats, lambasted the president for mentioning Floyd and claiming that it was ‘a great day’ for him, including the Washington Post.

“A previous version of this story incorrectly said that the president called the jobs report a ‘great day’ for George Floyd, the black man killed by white police in Minneapolis. In fact, the president was referring to growing calls for equal justice under the law,” the Post wrote in a correction.

As noted by The Daily Caller’s Greg Price, “a myriad of blue checks and news outlets” mistakenly claimed that the president “was saying that George Floyd would have been happy looking down on the job numbers.”

“The usual hacks are at it again,” he noted ahead of a series of tweets containing graphics of reports and tweets from others who made the same incorrect claim the Post initially made.

“Will any of these people retract?” Price asks during the thread.

As for the job numbers, the president, along with Vice President Mike Pence, both predicted in mid-March that employment would rocket skyward once the coronavirus-related shutdowns of businesses were lifted.

“And when we are through the Coronavirus, as the President said again today, we know this economy will come roaring back,” Pence said in an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. “And all the fundamentals are there, and the best thing we can do for the economy is what the President called on every American to do yesterday in the 15 days to slow the spread.”

Trump repeatedly predicted throughout the pandemic that once restrictions on businesses and other employers were lifted, the U.S. economy and job gains would soar once again, as have other Republicans.

Interestingly, in a mid-May report, the Washington Post suggested that Trump’s predictions of a newly energized economy and jobs market following the pandemic were misplaced.

“The White House’s rosy view of the U.S. economy’s trajectory clashes with the dire predictions of many mainstream economists, as well as Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell,” the Post reported.

“Many economists and Wall Street analysts say the unemployment rate could remain above 10 percent into 2021 — a level unseen since the Great Depression — even if lawmakers approve more emergency aid,” the paper continued, adding:

Numerous economists and the leader of the nation’s central bank are strongly warning against too sunny a view of the economic recovery. Critics say Trump and his aides have for months overstated how quickly the economy might rebound, and the White House risks exacerbating the already devastating economic impact of the virus by delaying additional emergency assistance.

 

Jon Dougherty

Staff Writer

Jon is a staff writer for BizPac Review with 30 years' worth of reporting experience, as well as an author and U.S. Army veteran. He has a BA in political science from Ashford University and an MA in national security studies/intelligence analysis from American Military University.
Jon Dougherty

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