China, Iran mock U.S. over ‘I can’t breathe’ riots. Thanks, Dems.

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The governments of China and Iran have mocked the United States as a series of violent riots and protests break out around the country following the death of Minneapolis resident George Floyd.

After getting criticized by the Trump administration for Beijing’s crackdown on protesters in Hong Kong this week, an official with the Chinese Communist Party government ripped U.S. leaders over their responses to the Floyd protests.

Hua Chunying, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson, ridiculed a tweet from Morgan Ortagus, a spokeswoman for the State Department, who was critical of China’s implementation of restrictive new measures in Hong Kong.

“This is a pivotal moment for the world. It will go down in history,” Ortagus wrote earlier last week. “Freedom loving people around the world must stand with the rule of law and hold to account the Chinese Communist Party, which has flagrantly broken its promises to the people of Hong Kong.”

Hua responded with, “I can’t breathe.”

Fox News adds:

That tweet was just the latest in an apparent strategy of China accusing the U.S. government of hypocrisy as it faced criticism for the way it countered pro-Democracy protests in Hong Kong. Most recently, President Trump has announced that he would block Hong Kong’s trading privileges after China’s ceremonial parliament voted to bypass the semi-autonomous territory in enacting national security legislation.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Sharif also piled on.

In a second tweet, Hua posted a video segment from RT, a Russian government-funded media outlet that serves as an outlet for the Kremlin, which ripped the U.S. over its support for violent protests in Hong Kong even while denouncing American protesters as “thugs,” an apparent reference to a tweet from President Donald Trump early on as rioting began.

Hua noted as well that the U.S. has implemented similar regulations against certain behaviors while claiming that Hong Kong was China’s “hand.”

“Some #US politician clamored that the national security legislation for #HKSAR breached the Joint Declaration and China may “take over” Hong Kong. Ridiculous. Hong Kong is part of China. Could someone be accused of taking over his own hand?” she wrote.

“The national security legislation for #HongKong targets only activities of secession, subverting state power, organizing and carrying out terrorist activities, and foreign interference in Hong Kong affairs,” Hua noted in a separate tweet.

“If the #US has no intention to interfere, why is it so mad and afraid? The national security legislation is just like a security door to better protect the safety and freedom inside. Why would anyone be mad with others for installing a security door at their own home?” Hua added.

“In any country including the #US, the central government holds the primary and ultimate responsibility for national security in all sub-national administrative regions.”

Last week, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo notified Congress that Hong Kong had been stripped of its high level of autonomy which was promised by Beijing after control over the international city was relinquished by the British government in 1997.

At that time, Chinese leaders pledged to follow a “one country, two systems” framework. But by implementing harsh new restrictions against democracy demonstrators last week, most of the autonomy has been stripped away.

Thus far, while local leaders have implemented curfews and requested assistance from state National Guard units, the Trump administration has not imposed any strict new lockdown measures similar to those enacted in Hong Kong by the Chinese government.

In any event, some Twitter users mocked Hua by posting video and images of Chinese police behaving badly, including one cop who pinned a suspect to a couch in a similar manner to the way Floyd was pinned, as she writhed and screamed.

Zarif’s tweet was similarly mocked by users, one of whom posted a short video clip appearing to show an Iranian police officer about to strike a citizen.

**Warning: Graphic

Jon Dougherty

Staff Writer
[email protected]

Jon is a staff writer for BizPac Review with 30 years' worth of reporting experience, as well as an author and U.S. Army veteran. He has a BA in political science from Ashford University and an MA in national security studies/intelligence analysis from American Military University.
Jon Dougherty

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