And they call Trump ‘dangerous’? Turns out, Chris Cuomo’s wife was bathing in bleach to fight coronavirus

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE.


(Photo by Michael N. Todaro/Getty Images for Prevent Child Abuse America)

CNN political commentator Chris Cuomo’s wife, Cristina, is facing criticism from practically everybody — except anybody at CNN, of course — for promoting a “crackpot coronavirus treatment” that’s been dubbed “dangerous.”

In a post to her blog published this week, the left-wing host’s wife listed the pseudoscientific holistic methods she’s been employing to treat her coronavirus infection. One of those methods involves bathing in Clorox bleach.

“At the direction of my doctor, Dr. Linda Lancaster, who reminded me that this is an oxygen-depleting virus, she suggested I take a bath and add a nominal amount of bleach. Yes, bleach,” the post reads.

Lancaster is not a doctor. She’s a self-described “naturopathic physician and homeopath” who boasts an ND and PhD, but not an MD. According to Jennifer Gunter, an actual doctor, Lancaster is known for spouting “nonsense,” not surprisingly.

“So, I add a small amount– ½ cup ONLY–of Clorox to a full bath of warm water–why? To combat the radiation and metals in my system and oxygenate it,” the post continues.

Cristina then shares the following quote from Lancaster: “We want to neutralize heavy metals because they slow-up the electromagnetic frequency of our cells, which is our energy field, and we need a good flow of energy. Clorox is sodium chloride — which is technically salt. There is no danger in doing this. It is a simple naturopathic treatment that has been used for over 75 years to oxygenate the cells.”

This is pseudoscientific drivel that’s being openly promoted by the wife of a host on one of the largest news networks in the world. That seems troubling, ergo why critics from both sides of the political aisle have slammed her post as “dangerous.”

Look:

Yet criticism of her pseudoscientific drivel — which has thus appeared at HuffPost, Business Insider, Page Six, USA Today and the Washington Examiner — will likely never make it onto the pages of CNN.

After all, the network has yet to address the elephant of a scandal involving Cuomo himself, who appears to have “faked” being in a self-imposed basement quarantine for weeks after being diagnosed with the coronavirus late last month.

It’s particularly ironic given that CNN is one of the networks that’s been spreading the lie that President Donald Trump recommended during Thursday’s White House coronavirus briefing that coronavirus patients ingest bleach to cure the deadly virus.

Observe:

This is false, though the lie has spread like wildfire and inspired condemnations and mockery from left-wing elites in media and Hollywood.

Look:

But this never happened, which might explain why the left is enthralled over it, what with the left’s adoration for fiction.

What the president actually did was respond to a study that shows that outdoor conditions reduce the coronavirus’s half-life while disinfectants kill it by asking his officials whether these results could be used to treat the virus.

“A question that probably some of you are thinking of if you’re totally into that world, which I find to be very interesting … supposing you brought the light inside the body, which you can do either through the skin or in some other way?” he asked.

“And then I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in one minute. And is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside or almost a cleaning?”

Listen:

This was a question, not medical advice or a recommendation. Suffice it to say, the claim that he told Americans to ingest bleach is a fake narrative.

But it’s not a fake narrative that Cuomo’s wife has touted bathing in bleach as a method to combat the virus. And perhaps because this story is actually real, it’ll never be covered by CNN, the most trusted name in fake news.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

Comments

Latest Articles