Troubling CDC rule forces states to list ‘presumed cases’ under COVID-19 deaths even if not confirmed

One of the biggest casualties in the ongoing coronavirus pandemic which continues to hold much of the U.S. hostage is also one of the least discussed: The loss of truth.

There is so much purposeful misinformation being spread by the mainstream media, the fringe ‘health’ media, and politicians — all in an effort to advance personal, political, or economic agendas — that it’s difficult to sift through all the noise to get to the facts about the COVID-19 outbreak.

And some of our own government agencies aren’t helping, including one that should be: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to reports Tuesday, the CDC is requiring states to recount coronavirus deaths to include both confirmed cases and presumed cases — that is, deaths of patients who have been diagnosed as having the virus but are not certain to have died from it.

We know that coronavirus attacks older Americans and people with pre-existing health conditions and co-morbidities like heart disease and diabetes. And we know that COVID-19 is a respiratory illness that can severely hamper a victim’s ability to breathe.

But what is less certain is the effect that the virus has on those preexisting conditions.

For instance, if a patient who had heart disease or diabetes died with the coronavirus, did the virus cause death or did the person die from the other preexisting condition while suffering from a mild case of COVID-19?

That’s a legitimate question because we also know that the vast majority of coronavirus cases are mild. What’s more, back in March, Stanford University biophysicist Michael Levitt predicted that forecasts of massive hospitalizations and deaths were wrong.

Nevertheless, the fake news mainstream media have embraced the worst of the predictions, leading governors to embrace them as well to justify shutting down their states and their economies, throwing tens of millions out of work for an undetermined period of time.

And now, it could just be that the CDC is asking states to engage in a fraudulent count so they can help justify the stringent lockdowns pushed by government health experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Deborah Birx.

The manipulation has already begun. Last week, New York City officials revised their coronavirus death toll upward by roughly 3,700 victims using the new CDC guidelines of presumed cases.

The revision drew the attention of President Donald Trump, who said during his daily briefing, “I see this morning where New York added 3,000 [sic] deaths because they died. Rather than [a] heart attack, they say heart attack caused by this.”

According to WorldOMeter:

Following new CDC guidelines: “As of April 14, 2020, CDC case counts and death counts include both confirmed and probable cases and deaths. This change was made to reflect an interim COVID-19 position statement issued by the Council for State and Territorial Epidemiologists on April 5, 2020. The position statement included a case definition and made COVID-19 a nationally notifiable disease.

A confirmed case or death is defined by meeting confirmatory laboratory evidence for COVID-19. A probable case or death is defined by i) meeting clinical criteria AND epidemiologic evidence with no confirmatory laboratory testing performed for COVID-19; or ii) meeting presumptive laboratory evidence AND either clinical criteria OR epidemiologic evidence; or iii) meeting vital records criteria with no confirmatory laboratory testing performed for COVID19”…

“This change is a further example of one of the many reasons why the label ‘confirmed cases’ (used by some to designate total cases) is incorrect,” the real-time data tabulation site noted.

A health worker in north Florida confirmed to BizPac Review that the new estimation guidelines are accurate. The source said even cases of extreme diarrhea are to be included as possible COVID-19 cases in order to get more emergency funding from the federal government.

Clearly, the CDC is attempting to inflate the coronavirus death rate — that much is undeniable. The question is why?

The only logical answer is that someone — or a group of ‘someones’ — wants the virus death count inflated to justify recommending stringent lock-down/shut-down and social distancing policies that have decimated our economy and job market.

Jon Dougherty

Staff Writer

Jon is a staff writer for BizPac Review with 30 years' worth of reporting experience, as well as an author and U.S. Army veteran. He has a BA in political science from Ashford University and an MA in national security studies/intelligence analysis from American Military University.
Jon Dougherty

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