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Kentucky’s GOP legislature overrides governor’s veto on voter ID requirements

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Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear tried to veto a proposed bill requiring voters to present photo ID at their polling location. Democrat opponents to the bill pointed to the absence of voter impersonation cases in Kentucky. They felt the requirement for voter ID would reduce turnout among the poor, minorities, the elderly and disabled. Sound familiar?

Governor Beshear earlier stated he vetoed the bill since it created an obstacle to voting rights and was “undermining our democracy.” This has been a Democrat talking point in many blue states attempting to derail the requirement for voter ID.

The Governor didn’t count on the supermajority of Republicans to react so strongly. Republicans outnumber Democrats 29-9 in the senate and 61-37 in the house. Republicans stated photo id is already required to open a bank account, cash a check, or even pick up sporting tickets at a will-call window. Republican Senator Robby Mills, the bill’s lead sponsor, said Tuesday it would add “guardrails in our voting procedures that will help cure vulnerabilities that exist.”

On April 14, Republicans overwhelmingly overrode the governor’s veto in both chambers.

Kentucky voters currently require ID to vote, but it does not have to be photo ID. The majority of states have passed voter ID laws that have been challenged and upheld by the US Supreme Court as being constitutional. Investigations have uncovered several instances of deceased persons who have been registered to vote in upcoming elections. In June 2017, a Virginian man was convicted of voter fraud wherein he registered 18 deceased persons. The Department of Justice said he had prepared the fraudulent registration forms using data from state Democratic party “walk sheets.”

President Trump has tweeted his opinion on voter ID on several occasions. He feels strongly about the need for photo ID in all states. The president has garnered strong support for this and organizations such as the Heritage Foundation have taken up the battle against voter fraud. Liberal groups claim known instances of fraud are inconsequential to an election outcome. However, the National Commission on Federal Election Reform stated the problem “is not the magnitude of voter fraud. In close or disputed elections, and there are many, a small amount of fraud could make the margin of difference.”


Gallup polls show four in five Americans support the requirement of voter ID at their voting place. This does not deter Democrat groups from continuing their fight against using photo ID to vote.

 

Julie Armstrong

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