State dismantles coronavirus field hospital that hasn’t treated a single patient

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It appears the experts were wrong again …

As per a request from Washington State officials, late last month the U.S. Army deployed 300 soldiers to Seattle to erect a makeshift field hospital inside the Centurylink Field Events Center to treat non-coronavirus patients.

“As we continue to do everything possible to slow the spread of COVID-19 throughout Washington state, we also need to prepare our healthcare delivery system to deal with people who are sick, or may become ill, as well as all the other health needs of Washingtonians,” Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced on March 27th.

“This field hospital will help us do that and I am grateful to the Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, and FEMA for bringing in these much-needed resources of people, supplies and equipment. … Together, we will stop the spread of this virus and help save lives.”

A week and a half later — and after God knows how much money was spent setting up 250 beds, X-ray machines, surgery facilities, a laboratory and an intensive care unit — the makeshift hospital finally opened for business this past week.

Look:

But only three short days later the hospital was promptly shuttered, having received zero patients. In explaining why the sudden about-face, Inslee openly admitted that his expert-based panic had been wrong by a long shot.

We requested this resource before our physical distancing strategies were fully implemented and we had considerable concerns that our hospitals would be overloaded with COVID-19 cases,” he said in a statement.

Those “considerable concerns” were driven by the faulty models devised by the experts at the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. These models have since been shown to be wildly inaccurate.

Case in point:

The IMHE models have been so incorrect that they prompted The Guardian, a left-wing paper, into asking, “How can coronavirus models get it so wrong?”

“The Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation in Seattle, based at the University of Washington, is the best organisation in the world at collecting data on diseases and mapping out why we fall ill,” the outlet wrote this week before trotting out an excuse.

“Its Global Burden of Disease study is a massive collaborative effort that is valued and used in every country. But even for such an organisation, predicting what will happen to us all as a result of Covid-19 is a tricky business.”

But it’s such a “tricky business” that so often produces faulty results, as demonstrated both by the IMHE models and also the many failed models used to predict climate change doom, then why are government policies being drafted based on them?

This is a question that an increasing number of Americans want to see answered, including contrarian Fox News host Tucker Carlson.

“Whatever is happening, this epidemic appears to be doing less damage than anticipated and it’s receding more quickly,” Carlson noted earlier this week. “Not so long ago, some of our leaders seemed on the verge of panic. On March 24, for example, Governor [Andrew] Cuomo of New York descended into a state of frenzy during his daily press conference.”

Cuomo dismissed the federal assistance New York had received as grossly inefficient. Tens of thousands of innocent New Yorkers were going to die, he said. They will choke to death while doctors do nothing to help them.”

Inslee did the same thing — multiple times, too.

“It was effective theater, but it was awful,” the FNC host continued. “That’s how badly New York needed them, except it didn’t need them. As it turned out, New York has many more beds and ventilators than it needs.”

And once again, the same is true of Inslee’s state.

Listen to his full commentary below:

What does all this tell you? It ought to tell you that, despite the mainstream narrative that experts know everything, trusting solely the “wisdom” of experts isn’t such a good idea. Don’t get it twisted, though. Expertise is GREAT, and experts should be respected, but the idea that they alone deserve to be heard and respected isn’t just elitist and shortsighted — it’s also wrong.

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Vivek Saxena

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