CDC issues guidance to enable essential workers exposed to COVID-19 to return to work

CDC guidelines essential workers
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced new guidelines that enable essential workers who were exposed to the coronavirus but are healthy to return to work under certain circumstances. (Pixabay)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new guidance that enables essential workers who were exposed to the coronavirus to return to work if they show no symptoms and exercise proper precautions.

The new guidelines for employees in essential industries such as health care and food supply can return to work as long as they’re asymptomatic, get their temperatures checked, wear face masks, and follow social distancing rules.

Critical infrastructure workers who have been exposed to COVID-19 but are asymptomatic should adhere to the following practices before and after their shifts, the CDC said:

  • Pre-Screen: Employers should take the employees’ temperature and assess symptoms prior to them starting work. Ideally, temperature checks should happen before the individual enters the facility.
  • Regular Monitoring: As long as the employee doesn’t have a temperature or symptoms, they should self-monitor under the supervision of their employer’s occupational health program.
  • Wear a Mask: The employee should wear a face mask at all times while in the workplace for 14 days after last exposure. Employers can issue facemasks or can approve employees’ supplied cloth face coverings in the event of shortages.
  • Social Distance: The employee should maintain 6 feet and practice social distancing as work duties permit in the workplace.
  • Disinfect and Clean workspaces: Clean and disinfect all areas such as offices, bathrooms, common areas, shared electronic equipment routinely.”

Under prior CDC guidelines, essential workers were told to stay at home for 14 days if they were exposed to anyone who tested positive for COVID-19.

Vice President Mike Pence, who is overseeing the White House coronavirus task force, said the new CDC guidance was issued after consultations with medical experts, including Dr. Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control.

The new CDC guidelines are a tentative first step toward eventually reopening the U.S. economy, which has been crushed by mass layoffs.

Ironically, one of the industries that has been hardest-hit by the coronavirus hysteria has been health care.

Tens of thousands of doctors and nurses have been furloughed or laid off as hospitals around the country canceled elective procedures (such as cancer and heart surgeries) to focus on coronavirus preparation.

Many areas of the country have not been infected by COVID-19 as badly as NYC, so hospitals in those regions are practically ghost towns.

Steward Health Care in Dallas, Texas, said it’s experiencing “a seismic financial shock” due to the coronavirus hysteria.

“Elective surgeries are the cornerstone of our hospital system’s operating model — and the negative impact due to the cancellations of these procedures cannot be overstated,” Steward Healthcare said in a statement.


(Source: WPXI)

Zeke Emanuel — the former health-policy adviser under Barack Obama— called for an 18-month national lockdown to stem the coronavirus outbreak.

Keep in mind that the academic models that Emanuel and Dr. Anthony Fauci have relied on to make their alarming projections have been overhyped or flat-out wrong.

The models grossly overstated COVID-19 infection rates and hospitalizations by a massive margin.

Social distancing and mass lockdowns were already factored into these projections, so the reduced infection/hospitalization rates were not due to mitigation efforts.

Nikki Haley wants WHO investigated for coronavirus fail: ‘They have to be held accountable’

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