‘Something ain’t Right!’ Diamond and Silk push back against sudden coronavirus racial narrative

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Only a small number of states have released information on the racial breakdown of those afflicted with the coronavirus, but early indications show black Americans are getting hit harder than other groups.

The issue was addressed Tuesday at the White House briefing, with President Trump acknowledging that African-Americans are disproportionately getting sick and even dying of the Chinese virus COVID-19.

“We’re doing everything in our power to address this challenge,” the president said. “It’s a tremendous challenge. It’s terrible.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, a member of the White House coronavirus task force, said blacks are more likely to have underlying health conditions that increase the risk of a “bad outcome” from the virus, such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and asthma.

“It’s not that they are getting infected more often. It’s that when they do get infected, their underlying medical conditions … wind them up in the ICU,” he said

“We’re very concerned about it,” Fauci went on to say. “It’s very sad. It’s nothing we can do about it right now except to try and give them the best possible care to avoid these complications.”

The leading underlying medical conditions in patients who tested positive for the virus are hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and obesity, all of which are more prevalent in the black community.

But Diamond and Silk, aka Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson, are saying not so fast.

“Black people are not the only ones who have underlying medical conditions…. What in the hell is going on? Something is off, and Something ain’t Right!” the pro-Trump ladies tweeted.

A second tweet from Diamond and Silk may add some clarity — it shows Dr. Deborah Birx explaining that if a person in the U.S contaminated with coronavirus dies from an underlying cause, that death is attributed to the virus.

In other words, a person who dies with the virus, but not from the virus, is still being counted as a COVID-19 death — meaning the numbers can’t be trusted.

Citing public health researchers, the New York Times attributed disproportionately high rates to the “entrenched inequalities in resources, health and access to care.”

“Longstanding inequalities also make African-Americans less likely to be insured, and more likely to have existing health conditions and face racial bias that prevents them from getting proper treatment,” the paper reported.

The Times said black Americans don’t have “the luxury of working from home,” which also puts them at higher risk, and reported that “initial indications are that doctors are less likely to refer African-Americans for testing when they visit a clinic with symptoms of Covid-19.”

Vox was more direct in its accusations: “Hundreds of years of racism has delivered poor health and economic outcomes for black people, making them more vulnerable in the pandemic.”

Not to make light of the subject, but conservative Candace Owens offered a different take on the racial aspect at play.

Here’s a sampling of responses to Diamond and Silk from Twitter, to include others who are just as skeptical:

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
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The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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