New poll reveals a good chunk of disbanded ‘Yang Gang’ members may help carry Trump to 2020 reelection

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As results came in Tuesday night in the New Hampshire 2020 Democratic primary, tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang announced that he was suspending his campaign, which effectively ended his bid for the White House.

Promising “we’ll be back,” Yang said he would support the eventual party nominee, but also said of the remaining Democratic field: “I can’t believe I lost to these people.”

This being a sentiment that some of his enthusiastic supporters, known as the “Yang Gang,” appear to hold as well, as some have reportedly expressed interest in backing President Donald Trump in November.

A new Stanford University/Reality Check poll shows that Trump is the second-most popular alternative among the Yang Gang, the New York Post reported.

A surprising development, given Yang’s campaign pledge to give Americans $1,000 a month just for drawing breath. The candidate called this taxpayer freebie “universal basic income,” and it’s a sure bet that Trump is not a supporter of the idea.

In addressing supporters late Tuesday, Yang was far less rabid in his criticism of the president, compared to his fellow Democratic candidates, and insisted that Trump “is not the cause of all our problems.”

“I hope this campaign can be a message, and a word of caution and guidance to my democratic colleagues that Donald Trump is not the cause of all of our problems,” he said. “He is a symptom of a disease that has been building up in our communities for years.”

With Yang throwing in the proverbial towel, 11% of Yang supporters surveyed in the Stanford University/Reality Check poll said that they would now support re-electing Trump, according to the Post.

Not surprisingly, many aligned with socialist Bernie Sanders — but a larger number were undecided.

More from the Post:

Democrat socialist Bernie Sanders was still the preferred alternative with 33 percent of the disbanded “Yang Gang,” but the survey showed supporters of the zany tech entrepreneur were failing to coalesce around the field of Democratic candidates.

A third of all supporters were still undecided while just 4 percent realigned with former Vice President Joe Biden. Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota received 2.5 percent and ex-South Bend, Ind. Pete Buttigieg just 1 percent.

 

Pollsters Benjamin Leff and Sam Riber explained that the president’s appeal to the Yang Gang is centered on the importance of job creation.

“Yang’s message of job loss due to technological change likely resonated with previous Trump supporters who felt excluded from America’s modern economy,” Leff stated.

Pointing out that only 50% of Yang supporters identify as Democrats,” Leff said, “this presents a challenge for the remaining Democratic candidates hoping to rally the Yang Gang behind them.”

The study showed that 13% of Yang’s supporters are Republican, while the other 36% are independent.

As for the promise of coming back, the Post noted there has been rife speculation that Yang may be mulling a run for mayor of New York City.

Saagar Enjeti, who co-hosts “Rising” on Hill TV, shared some remarks from Yang’s supporters who are turned off on Sanders, who is now the front-runner, believe it or not.

“Hearing from some members of the Yang Gang who now say they will vote Trump 2020 because they want to support a working-class candidate but don’t like Bernie’s culturally woke element. Interesting phenomenon,” he tweeted.

One supporter expressed concern about what Sanders would do to the economy and added, “Trump keeps things real. I may not like what he says all the time, but who we see is who he is.”

Another was motivated out of pure spite over how Yang was treated by “the left.”

Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg also appeals to some of Yang’s supporters.

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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