Schiff pleads with Senate in closing statement: You know you can’t trust Trump and Russia with 2020 election

Screenshot.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., the Democrats’ lead manager in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, delivered his closing argument Thursday evening — an emotional argument centering on right and wrong, not the legality of the president’s behavior.

Following a familiar theme, the Democrat undermined the integrity of U.S. elections in a desperate attempt to convince a seemingly unimpressed jury of senators to not only convict Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, but remove him from office.

Schiff fell back on the Russian collusion hoax to question the results of the coming election before it even happens.

“Let’s say [Russia] starts blatantly interfering in our election again to help Donald Trump,” he said. “Can you have the least bit of confidence that Donald Trump will stand up to them and protect our national interest over his own personal interests? You know you can’t, which makes him dangerous to this country.”

The warning goes full circle from Schiff’s opening statement when he moved to take the decision out of the hands of the American people to decide who their president is by questioning the integrity of the 2020 election should Trump win.

“The President’s misconduct cannot be decided at the ballot box, for we cannot be assured that the vote will be fairly won,” Schiff said then.

A choked-up Schiff placed his party of co-conspirators on the side of right, wrapping himself in the U.S. Constitution as he aligned the cabal behind the partisan attempt to take out a duly elected president with the Founding Fathers.

“The Framers couldn’t protect us from ourselves if right and truth doesn’t matter,” he said.

Schiff, who has been praised all week by the left as a master litigator, said President Trump can’t be trusted to “do what’s right for the country,” insisting that he will only “do what’s right for himself.”

“If right doesn’t matter — if right doesn’t matter, it doesn’t matter how good the Constitution is. It doesn’t matter how brilliant the Framers were,” Schiff proclaimed. “Doesn’t matter how good or bad our advocacy in this trial is. Doesn’t matter how well written the oath of impartiality is. If right doesn’t matter, we’re lost. If the truth doesn’t matter, we’re lost.”

The only problem with “truth” is that in Washington, DC, it’s a moving target that has more to do with political motivations than it does with facts.

Schiff named Rudy Giuliani, the president’s personal attorney, charging the president believed him over US intelligence agencies when it came to Ukraine and former Vice President Joe Biden.

“Whether we can say it publicly or we can’t say it publicly, we know what we’re dealing here with this president,” he said. “And this is why he needs to be removed. Donald Trump chose Rudy Giuliani over his own intelligence agencies — he chose Rudy Giuliani over his own FBI Director. He chose Rudy Giuliani over his own national security advisers.”

“He chose not to believe them. He chose to believe Rudy Giuliani,” Schiff added. “That makes him dangerous to us, to our country.”

Schiff was also clear the impeachment of President Trump is really about the 2020 election — an election Democrats lack confidence in winning, it would seem.

In the process, he again cast doubt on the honesty of our elections.

“You may be asking, how much damage can he really do in the next several months until the election,” Schiff said. “A lot. A lot of damage.”

“This is why if you find him guilty, you must find that he should be removed. Because right matters,” he pleaded. “Because right matters and truth matters. Otherwise, we are lost.”

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

Comments

Latest Articles