Canada’s top newspaper rips away welcome mat with brutal message for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

(BBC News video screenshot)

Nobody wants them but the queen, and she could be jiving too …

In a blistering op-ed on Monday, the editorial board for one of Canada’s most widely circulated newspapers bluntly told the Duke and Duchess of Sussex – Prince Harry and Meghan Markle – that they’re not welcome in the North American nation.

In response to the sudden announcement of a vague and evolving plan for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex … to move to Canada while remaining part of the Royal Family, the Trudeau government’s response should be simple and succinct: No,” members of The Globe and Mail’s editorial board wrote.

They added that Canada isn’t “a halfway house for anyone looking to get out of Britain while remaining a royal” …

Ouch!

Granted, they claimed the matter wasn’t a personal one but rather a constitutional one.

“A royal living in this country does not accord with the long-standing nature of the relationship between Canada and Britain, and Canada and the Crown,” they explained.

“If they were ordinary private citizens, plain old Harry and Meghan from Sussex, they would be welcome. But this country’s unique monarchy, and its delicate yet essential place in our constitutional system, means that a royal resident — the Prince is sixth in the line of succession — is not something that Canada can allow. It breaks an unspoken constitutional taboo.”

The problem, they explained in further detail, is that Canada maintains a system of monarchy virtually the same as that of the U.K.

“The concept of the Crown is at the centre of the Canadian system of government,” they noted. “Bills aren’t law until they receive royal assent; crimes are prosecuted in the name of Her Majesty by lawyers known as crowns; your passport asks foreign states for protection in the name of the Queen. All of that comes out of a constitutional order, more than a century-and-a-half old, based on the British model.”

But what would happen if one of the U.K.’s monarchs suddenly set up shop in Canada? How would that affect the nation’s current system? While the answer is unknown, The Globe and Mail’s board made it clear they don’t even want to know.

“[T]hough Canada borrowed from Britain, it isn’t Britain and never was. And this country long ago took steps to make that unmistakably clear,” they wrote.

They concluded their editorial by writing that while they wish the Sussexes “the best of luck,” the rogue royals need to look elsewhere for a new home.

The piece was published five days after the royal couple announced plans to ditch the Royal Family and set out on a new “progressive” life.

Queen Elizabeth II and other senior royals were reportedly “hurt” and “devastated” by the announcement and the backhanded way in which the couple had made it.

Reports suggest the royal couple hope to relocate to Los Angeles, California once President Donald Trump leaves office. In the meantime, they seek to settle in Canada.

But whether they would even be able to obtain citizenship in Canada remains unknown. The problem, according to Philip Lagasse, a professor at Canada’s Carleton University, is that they’ll need to go through the same immigration hurdles as normal people.

“Technically speaking, Lagassé said in a phone interview on Tuesday afternoon, Harry and Meghan could be given a ‘special grant,'” Newsweek reported. “However, that would be highly unlikely, as it ‘would be pretty controversial, politically.'”

“That would be controversial… simply because of the number of people who face difficult circumstances when trying to navigate the citizenship procedures in Canada,” the professor reportedly said.

“Everybody has a good claim… You know what I mean? A lot of people have a claim to something they want to be able to do here, so why would they get special treatment?”

In short, the royal couple would have to prove their worth, and they wouldn’t be allowed to cite their royalty as a legitimate form of merit.

A spokesperson with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada has confirmed that this is indeed correct.

There are no provisions in the Citizenship Act that confer Canadian citizenship status to members of the royal family,” the spokesperson said. “In order to become legal permanent residents of Canada, they would need to apply through our normal immigration processes.”

It’s not clear how Markle, who’s used to getting anything she wants, will handle this.

The spokesperson noted though that British royals are “not required to seek authorization to come to and stay in Canada as visitors.”

As for their plans to eventually relocate to California, those too are a bit complicated. Markle recently reportedly revived a California-based lifestyle company, Frim Fram Inc., but immediately relocated its address to Delaware to save on taxes.

“Corporation filings seen by The Telegraph show that the move was made on New Year’s Eve, while Meghan and her husband were taking a break in Canada, planning to quit their roles as ‘senior’ royals and become financially independent,” The Daily Telegraph confirmed Tuesday.

The fact that the royal couple want to relocate to California after the president leaves office seems to speak strongly of their lack of real-world knowledge and common sense.

The president cut taxes for all Americans and businesses, whereas the couple’s preferred Democrat Party heroes in California have raised them.

And yet …

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Vivek Saxena

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