Omar under fire for giggling through statement covering US war causalities, claims PTSD over Iran conflict

(Video screenshot)

As Democrat Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee spoke during a presser with her colleagues Wednesday about the causalities of the Iraq War and how they allegedly relate to President Donald Trump’s recent actions against Iran, one of her colleagues chose to act like a dunce.

Instead of listening keenly to Lee’s words, that colleague, antisemitic Muslim Rep. Ilhan Omar, used her time to hobnob with her congressional pals, including fellow antisemitic Muslim Rep. Rashida Tlaib, and laugh repeatedly over some joke.

Watch:

 

“I’m very glad to say that I was part of the 132 and also the vote for [Rep.] Barbara Lee’s amendment, but I think that the point of that is that that is the same war that we’re dealing with today,” Lee could be heard saying in the recording above.

“We never solved any problems with AUMF [the Authorization for Use of Military Force], we left four thousand plus, maybe even forty-four hundred dead, and over sixty thousand who came back injured in some form and the war never ended.”

As Lee began speaking about being “part of the 132” House Republicans and Democrats who voted in October of 2002 against authorizing the use of military force against Iraq, Omar and her younger colleagues briefly exchanged a smile.

This upset some:

 

But as Omar’s colleagues returned to listening to Lee continue her speech, she for some reason chose to seemingly ignore it altogether.

First, she turned around to start what appeared to be a humorous conversation with Tlaib. Moments later, she turned to the colleague on her right to speak with her as well. Then she turned back to Tlaib. Throughout the whole ordeal, she smiled and giggled.

It’s unclear what the congresswoman found funny regarding the thousands who died or were injured during the Iraq War. Odder still is what the congresswoman chose to say when her time at the podium arrived.

I feel ill a little bit because of everything that is taking place, and I think every time I hear conversations around war, I find myself being stricken with PTSD,” she claimed. “And I find peace knowing that I serve with great advocates for peace and people who have shown courage against war.”

Listen:

 

Some took offense to the very notion of her suffering from PTSD.

“Rep. Ilhan Omar complained she’s ‘stricken with PTSD’ because of recent events in the Middle East,” Republican Rep. Jim Banks, a military veteran, tweeted in anger.

“This is a disgrace and offensive to our nation’s veterans who really do have PTSD after putting their life on the line to keep America safe.”

Look at this and similar tweets below:

In fairness, Omar immigrated to the United States as an ungrateful refugee during the height of the still-ongoing Somalian Civil War in 1992. That year alone, an estimated 350,000 Somalians reportedly died of disease, starvation or war.

That said, even if the congresswoman really has been suffering from PTSD symptoms, why would she then laugh and giggle during a discussion about the American lives lost during the Iraq War, some wondered. It seemed to suggest she was full of it.

Look:

While the congressman has not yet explained her decision to act like a dunce as Lee spoke of Iraq War casualties, she has responded to the critics complaining about her PTSD.

“I survived war as a child and deal with post-traumatic stress disorder — much like many who have served or lived through war. It’s shameful that you as a member of Congress would erase the PTSD of survivors,” she tweeted to Banks early Wednesday evening:

By the same token, many would argue that it’s “shameful that YOU as a member of Congress would” laugh, giggle and hobnob during a discussion about the thousands of Americans who died during the Iraq War. Fair is fair, after all …

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
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V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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