NYT’s Paul Krugman’s credibility in question when he uses Twitter to announce incendiary hacking claim

(CNA video screenshot)

Suppose you just learned that someone had “compromised” your Internet and used it to download child pornography. How would you respond?

Would you (a) go to the police, (b) broadcast to the entire world that someone had used your Internet to download child pornography or (c) blame it on a conspiracy theory?

If you chose (a), then congratulations, you’re not Paul Krugman, an economics columnist for The New York Times who’s been accused of being wrong about virtually everything.

In a since-deleted tweet posted Wednesday afternoon, the economic Miss Cleo revealed that someone had used his Internet to download child pornography and blamed the alleged crime on a conspiracy theory known as “Qanon.”

Look:

Naturally, his tweet prompted an outpouring of questions all centered on the same basic theme: “What the hell is wrong with you, dude?”

Observe:

As of Thursday morning, there was some good news, some bad news, and some really good news.

Good news: Evidence now suggests that Krugman was simply hit by scammers who were trying to manipulate him into forking over money to fix the problem.

“Deleted original tweet. Times thinks it may have been a scam. Anyway, will have more security in future,” he wrote in an update late Wednesday.

Look:

Moreover, according to politically active music video director Robby Starbuck, Krugman has a history of being fooled by scammers.

Look:

Of course, not everybody believes the “scam” story. Some think Krugman’s tweets were part of a plot (of conspiracy) to deflect blame from himself …

Look:

While it’s possible, Occam’s razor suggests this isn’t the case…

Bad News: As Starbuck also noted, Krugman is considered a “smart” voice, particularly in regard to politics. Yet he’s easily fooled and has a history of being wrong, especially in regard to President Donald Trump’s otherwise booming economy.

“Paul Krugman is a Nobel Laureate in economics, but he manages to be wrong every time he makes a prediction about Trump and the economy,” National Review columnist David Harsanyi put it in the meta description of a piece he published in November.

Fact-check: TRUE.

“Here Comes the Trump Slump,” the headline of a piece Krugman himself published a month earlier in October read.

“[I]t’s starting to look as if Trump really will achieve something unique: He may well be the first president of modern times to preside over a slump that can be directly attributed to his own policies, rather than bad luck,” he wrote at the time.

Three months later, that projected slump is nowhere in sight …

In fact, both the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hit record intraday highs this week after the president delivered a speech about the situation concerning Iran.

But again, despite being wrong — and falling for obvious scams — he continues to be considered a “renowned” voice. Why?

Really Good News: Krugman’s self-own has inadvertently helped demonstrate his incompetence and naivety to the public at large.

And so maybe now people will think twice before trusting his so-called “wisdom” …

Vivek Saxena

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