Pelosi sends letter declaring she will lead Congress to usurp Trump’s authority, tie his hands on Iran

Screengrab Fox News

Democrats are so accustomed to undermining President Donald Trump that they do so even in matters involving possible conflict with longtime foes.

Just as she did with impeachment, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is politicizing the U.S. airstrike that killed Iranian Gen. Qassam Soleimani, this coming in the face of plenty of blustering and saber rattling from Iran about retaliations.

In a letter to fellow Democrats, the speaker declared Sunday that she will attempt to limit the president’s abilities as commander in chief to conduct military operations against Iran.

Pelosi called the airstrike “provocative and disproportionate,” and complained that Trump did not properly notify Congress in advance.

In effect, Pelosi is trying to usurp the president’s authority as commander in chief to protect the lives of Americans.

“As members of Congress, our first responsibility is to keep the American people safe,” she wrote. “For this reason, we are concerned that the administration took this action without the consultation of Congress and without respect for Congress’s war powers granted to it by the Constitution.”

“This week, the House will introduce and vote on a War Powers Resolution to limit the President’s military actions regarding Iran,” Pelosi added. “It reasserts Congress’s long-established oversight responsibilities by mandating that if no further Congressional action is taken, the Administration’s military hostilities with regard to Iran cease within 30 days.”

Democrats have engaged in fear-mongering, warning about the risk of escalation in the region in the face of Trump warning of additional actions should Iran retaliate for Soleimani’s death.

As head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ elite Quds Force, which the U.S. had declared a Foreign Terrorist Organization, Soleimani had the blood of hundreds of Americans on his hands.

The president ordered the airstrike after the U.S. Embassy was attacked in Baghdad, amid Pentagon concerns that the Iranian commander was “actively developing plans to attack” American interests.

There have been a series of provocative actions from Iran since last summer when two oil tankers exploded in the Persian Gulf, culminating with the recent death of a U.S. contractor at a base in Iraq and the subsequent attack on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.

The embassy was targeted after a U.S. airstrike killed 25 fighters of an Iran-backed militia, Kata’ib Hezbollah, in retaliation for the killing of the U.S. contractor.

More from Fox News on the War Powers Act and the White House:

The first War Powers Resolution was passed in 1973 in an effort to prevent presidents from using the military without congressional approval. Since then, questions of presidential compliance have become common, with controversy stemming from President Bill Clinton’s actions in Kosovo and President Barack Obama’s operations in Libya.

On Saturday, the White House sent Congress formal notification of the drone strike under the War Powers Act, a senior administration official told The Associated Press. The notification, required by law within 48 hours of the introduction of American forces into an armed conflict or a situation that could lead to war, had to be signed and sent to Congress.

 

For what it’s worth, President Trump responded to sniveling Democrats questioning his authority as commander in chief to protect the lives of Americans, telling them his tweet will serve as notification to Congress of any military response to Iranian actions.

The president tweeted: “These Media Posts will serve as notification to the United States Congress that should Iran strike any U.S. person or target, the United States will quickly & fully strike back, & perhaps in a disproportionate manner. Such legal notice is not required, but is given nevertheless!”

 

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
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The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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