Trump thanks Dem congressman for having guts to be honest after reports he could switch to GOP

Screengrab Fox News

When it comes to impeaching President Donald Trump, the only bipartisanship in Washington, DC is in opposing the politically-motivated campaign to remove a duly elected president from office.

This was seen in the Democrats’ vote to formalize the impeachment inquiry back in October, which took place with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., presiding, with the party seeing two members of its caucus, Reps. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey and Collin Peterson of Minnesota, join with Republicans to vote against the resolution.

And there are now reports one of those two lawmakers, Van Drew, is not only going to vote against the two articles of impeachment expected to go before the House this week for a floor vote, but intends to switch parties and join the GOP.

A member of the centrist Blue Dog Coalition, Van Drew met with President Trump on Friday and was encouraged to switch parties, the Washington Post reported. Facing a primary challenger to a seat previously held by a Republican, in a district Trump won by just 5 points, Van Drew is reportedly hoping to secure the president’s support.

The Democrat believes impeachment is too divisive and comes too close to the 2020 presidential election, according to the Post.

CNN reporter Manu Raju reported on Twitter last week that Van Drew would not vote for impeachment, including a quote from the lawmaker: “As I said before, my position never changed unless there was something new and unusual – and there is nothing new and unusual.”

President Trump responded to that tweet on Saturday thanking Van Drew for having the “guts” to say so.

“Thank you for your honesty Jeff. All of the Democrats know you are right, but unlike you, they don’t have the “guts” to say so!” the president tweeted late Saturday evening, just after midnight.

The president also responded to a tweet from one of the Washington Post reporters who reported on Van Drew possibly switching parties.

“Wow, that would be big. Always heard Jeff is very smart!” Trump said.

Van Drew told reporters last week there was no cause for impeaching Trump and that the effort will backfire on Democrats when the Senate fails to convict the president, as expected.

“I don’t see anything there worthy of actually taking a president out of office,” he said. “I’m concerned about splitting our nation apart.”

“I always say, you got to really be careful what you wish for in life,” Van Drew added. “I think (Trump) actually gets help with this, to be honest with you. He’s going to be able to go all over the country and say he is found not guilty.”

Peterson has yet to decide how he will vote on the articles of impeachment — Trump was charged with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — but is considering a vote against them.

I’m leaning no,” Peterson told the Washington Examiner last week. “I want to look at everything.”

Peterson predicted “four or five” Democrats may very well vote against the articles.

Democrats need 216 votes to pass the impeachment articles, which means that Pelosi can tolerate up to 17 defections, so there’s little chance that the House will not vote to impeach Trump.

In an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said there’s “no chance” the Senate will vote to remove Trump from office, adding that he wouldn’t be surprised to pick up one or two Democrat votes for acquittal.

Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, are candidates to buck the Democratic Party.

While the Democratic Party has much of the media in their corner as they attempt to undo the vote of 63 million American voters less than a year before the 2020 election, opposition to impeachment from within their party will play havoc on controlling the political narrative.

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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