Rally-goers say Trump’s removal could lead ‘second Civil War’: ‘My .357 Magnum is comfortable with that. End of story!’

(CBS News video screenshot)

Hypothetically speaking, who would be more likely to erupt in violence — Trump supporters apoplectic over the president’s conviction and removal from office, or Trump haters irate over the president’s reelection to office?

To hear the media tell it, the answer is obvious: Those pesky Trump supporters. But in fairness to the media, some Trump supporters made the mistake of providing the media with all the proof they needed to make their case.

Speaking with CBS News at President Donald Trump’s “big” rally in Pennsylvania on Tuesday, several of his supporters warned that a second Civil War could be triggered were the GOP-led Senate to convict the president and remove him from office.

Listen:

One particularly impassioned supporter even brought up his .357 Magnum.

“He’s not gonna be removed. He’s not gonna be removed. He’s not gonna be removed,” the supporter defiantly repeated in response to being asked how he’d react were Trump removed.

“Do you feel confident in that?” the unnamed CBS reporter asked.

“My .357 Magnum is comfortable with that. End of story!” the angry Trump supporter replied.

He shouldn’t have said that. In fact, he shouldn’t have even answered the question. Why? Because there’s zero chance the president will be convicted. It’s just not possible, according to multiple analysts, commentators and pundits from the right and left:

Other Trump supporters whom CBS spoke with echoed the previous supporter’s general sentiment, though they stayed clear of being as vitriolic about it.

“I think it would cause physical violence in this country that we haven’t seen since the first Civil War. I think it would become the second Civil War,” one said.

“There’ll be a lot of mad Americans. Possibly, 70, 80 thousand — 70, 80 million Americans on the loose, not very happy. What we’re seeing is a divided country. Both sides are dug in, no one’s budging,” another added.

Fair enough.

But as noted earlier, Trump will never be convicted. The GOP runs the Senate, and an overwhelming majority of Republicans back the president, save for a few “feckless old ladies.” For the president to be convicted, a majority of this majority would have to convert and, in doing so, risk being voted out of office by their enraged constituents.

Going back to the original question, while the president’s removal from office is a virtual impossibility, his reelection to office is highly plausible — if not inevitable. But how would the president’s most passionate haters respond to it?

If their past behavior is any indicator, they wouldn’t respond well …

Over the course of the past three years, the president’s most hardcore haters have assaulted and sucker-punched Trump supporters, tried to run them over, stalked them, vandalized their property, sent deadly toxins to the president, vandalized his golf course, harassed his administration officials and much, much, much more.

Meanwhile, a disturbing number of notable individuals with prominence — think celebrated pundits, actors, musicians, etc. — have spouted horrifyingly violent rhetoric about the president and his supporters.

Remember this?

How about this?

Keep in mind these are mainstream figures. While there was a similar level of animosity toward former President Barack Hussein Obama, it wasn’t mainstream.

Nor did Obama’s presidency inspire the mobs and riots that have become commonplace these past three years thanks to both the anti-Trump animus expressed by celebrity figures and also the antics of left-wing groups such as Antifa.

This isn’t to say there weren’t protests. The Tea Party movement spawned numerous peaceful protests in which anti-Obama conservatives called for lower taxes, less spending, decreased regulation and the repeal of Obamacare.

See some of these protests below:

The protesters were certainly loud and opinionated, but they weren’t violent, they didn’t speak of blowing up the White House and they certainly didn’t speak of assassinating Obama.

Now contrast this with what happened once Trump stepped into office.

Look:

That’s a lot of violence

Dovetailing back to the Trump supporters questioned by CBS News, they shouldn’t have spoken of violence. Nor should they harbor any desires for violence in their hearts.

Nobody, in fact, should be motivated to violence just because of politics. The fact is that politics is a see-saw that will forever swing back and forth between Republicans and Democrats. And if someone can’t handle this continual transfer of power between two perpetually dueling sides, then that someone should probably avoid talking about or participating in politics …

(Or handling guns, for that matter!)

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Vivek Saxena

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