House Dems fail to convince new voters that Trump should be impeached

(CBS News video screenshot/White House)

Unfortunately for House Democrats, not much has changed in the public’s perception of President Donald Trump since they began their second round of impeachment hearings.

While a 47% majority of Americans support these efforts, according to new Yahoo News/YouGov polling data, this level of supports remains unchanged since last month.

“[T]he overall needle on impeachment and removal has not moved since the previous Yahoo News/YouGov survey, which was conducted as televised hearings were wrapping up late last month. (The new poll was conducted from Dec. 4 to Dec. 6.),” Yahoo News confirmed Friday.

Perhaps it’s just an issue of time then, given as it’s only been a couple of weeks? Well, no, because long-term polling averages bode even worse for House Democrats.

Averages maintained by RealClearPolitics show that support for impeachment has steadily declined while the opposition has steadily increased over the past three months:

(Source: RealClearPolitics)

It would appear that more and more Americans are coming to believe that the impeachment drive is a “hoax,” as the president himself called it Saturday.

“The impeachment thing is a total hoax,” he said from Fort Lauderdale. “The numbers have totally swung our way. They don’t want to see impeachment, especially in the swing states. They’ve swung our way. I’ve never seen a swing like this because people realize it’s a total hoax.”

Listen:

His point about swing states was spot-on.

“Polls in key 2020 states show that support for impeaching President Trump is lower than in national impeachment polls,” Axios reported last week, citing a dozen October and November polls in pivotal battleground/swing states.

These polls show that an average of only 44 percent of voters back impeachment, while a stark 51 percent majority opposite it.

So while it’s nice for Democrats that 57 percent of Californians support impeachment, as one example of a pro-impeachment state, decidedly left-wing states such as California and New York ultimately don’t matter, since their electoral votes are already guaranteed.

The same may not be said of undecided battleground/swing states like Arizona, Florida, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Wisconsin, all of which are purple bastions that currently leaning heavily to the right.

“The polls signal that pursuing impeachment could potentially hurt Democrats in states they need to carry to defeat Trump in his bid for a second term,” Axios’s report concludes.

Meanwhile, the so-called “moderate” Democrats who operate out of these states face what could be the most precarious situations of their career thanks to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Last Thursday, Pelosi authorized top congressional Democrats to begin drafting articles of impeachment against the president and confirmed that an official impeachment vote will occur sometime soon.

The announcement was made amid a flurry of evidence showing that “moderate” Democrats are suffering lower poll numbers and backlash from their constituents over this support of impeachment:

“Now, Pelosi is adding to their woes by forcing them to vote to recommend the removal of a president that voters in their districts say they plan to reelect,” The Washington Post’s resident conservative, Marc A. Thiessen, pointed out last Thursday. “Already, she forced them to vote to authorize an impeachment inquiry, and all but two did so. But there is a world of difference between backing an impeachment inquiry and voting to impeach.”

“Before the hearings began, swing-state voters said they supported the impeachment inquiry by a margin of 50 to 45 percent, but opposed impeaching and removing Trump by 53 to 43 percent. After weeks of wall-to-wall hearings, polls show that Democrats failed to move the needle in favor of impeachment and removal. Indeed, in Wisconsin, opposition to removal has nearly doubled. In other words, Democrats have failed to make their case.”

Yet despite Democrats failing to make their case, Pelosi expects all of them to fall in line and follow her down the impeachment plank notwithstanding.

But forget Thiessen, because even some Democrats themselves have expressed concern about her impeachment crusade.

“I think they better start paying attention. It goes back to, how broad is your message, how much are you reaching out, how are you making it about the people you want to serve,” former North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp said recently on ABC News.

And one of the problems we have is that now we’re in impeachment land, and there’s very little discussion about what’s going to change for people in the real world. And impeachment itself is not a discussion about what this means for me. It just seems more of Washington dysfunction, more of the rancor that people absolutely hate.”

Listen:

After serving in office for six years, Heitkamp finally got knocked out of her seat during the 2018 midterm elections last year. She’d been a “moderate” Democrat — one who made the mistake of voting against Supreme Court Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation based on dubious, unsubstantiated allegations of sexual abuse.

It’s telling that the dubious, unsubstantiated allegations that cost Heitkamp her career are so similar to the dubious, unsubstantiated that are now being used to attack the president. Based on this alone, Democrats may want to heed her warnings.

Vivek Saxena

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

V. Saxena is a staff writer for BizPac Review with a decade of experience as a professional writer, and a lifetime of experience as an avid news junkie. He holds a degree in computer technology from Purdue University.
Vivek Saxena

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