Three new polls: Trump’s approval rating among black voters has quadrupled

Trump Young Black Leadership Summit 2019
Trump’s approval rating among black voters has quadrupled since 2016, according to three new polls. Rasmussen, Emerson and Marist polls have the president above a 33% approval rating among this key demographic. (screenshot)

Three new polls indicate that President Trump’s approval rating among black voters has quadrupled since 2016. Emerson and Rasmussen have Trump polling at 34%, while the Marist poll shows Trump enjoying a 33% approval among black voters.

This is significant because President Trump won the electoral college in a landslide in 2016 despite scoring just 8% approval from black voters.  If Trump can get even half the figure among black voters that he’s getting now in these polls, he will easily win reelection in 2020.

New Polls: Black American support for Trump

Republican strategist Deneen Borelli tweeted: “Rasmussen Poll tracking poll finds Donald Trump’s total black approval at 34%. Democrats’ worst nightmare. Boom.”

Here are the Emerson poll results, which are consistent with both the Rasmussen and Marist polls:

While polls are not always accurate (think back to all the polls that breathlessly claimed that Hillary Clinton would crush Trump in a landslide), there are other indications that black voter support for President Trump is climbing.

As BizPac Review reported, unemployment in the United States is at a record low. Notably, black unemployment has tumbled to a record low under the Trump administration — fueled, in part, by plunging unemployment among black women.

“If only half of that 34% of blacks vote for Trump, it will devastate the Democrats’ candidate,” the American Thinker observed. “Democrat victories in this evenly divided nation depend on both high black turnout and high black support. Hillary Clinton’s failure to drive both elements of black support to the levels Barack Obama enjoyed was a major cause of her defeat.”

Not surprisingly, Never-Trumpers like CNN talking head Ana Navarro disputed the latest polls indicating mushrooming black support for Trump.

In a racist tweet, Navarro chirped:  “Zero chance this is accurate. Zero. The poll must have only been conducted in the homes of Ben Carson, Kanye, that sheriff guy with the hat and those two Cubic Zirconia & Polyester-Spandex ladies.”

However, Victor Davis Hanson — a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, a public-policy think tank — said the trend indicated by the polls is devastating for the Democrats.

“Even 20 percent African-American support for Trump would all but dismantle Democratic Party presidential hopes for 2020,” Hanson wrote at Real Clear Politics. “Hillary Clinton lost the 2016 election with 88 percent of the black vote. That was about a six-point falloff from Barack Obama’s share of the black vote in 2012.”

Hanson continued: “Even a small drop in African-American turnout or anything less than the usual 85 percent to 90 percent supermajority for a Democratic presidential candidate on Election Day can prove fatal.”


(Source: “Ingraham Angle”)

Hanson pointed out that the Democratic Party’s alienation of white voters will ensure their defeat. Why? Because you can’t afford to ignore an entire group of voters.

“Republican presidential candidates now routinely win 55 percent to 60 percent of the so-called white vote, and about 70 percent of voters are white,” Hanson wrote. “That lopsided margin may widen further, given that progressive Democrats are not making any effort to recapture turned-off white working-class voters.”

Victor Davis Hanson remarked that President Trump is outworking the Democrats (as usual). And that will likely drive him home to victory in 2020.

“Trump is reaching out to the African-American community to a much greater degree than progressives are reaching out to the estranged white working class,” Hanson noted.

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Samantha Chang

Senior Staff Writer
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Samantha Chang is a senior staff writer for BizPac Review. Based in New York City, she is a law school graduate and a financial editor.
Samantha Chang

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