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Pack of feral hogs attack and kill woman outside Texas home

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Screen capture … Credit: A&E

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An alarming, horrific predawn attack by feral hogs on a woman outside a Texas home resulted in her death on Sunday, according to the Chambers County sheriff.

Christine Rollins, a caregiver to an elderly couple in Anahuac, failed to enter their home on time for work as scheduled between 6 and 6:30 am. One of the homeowners discovered her remains in the front yard between her car and the house.

“In my 35 years, I will tell you it’s one of the worst things I’ve ever seen,” Sheriff Brian Hawthorne told reporters in a Monday news conference.

Multiple feral hogs took Rollins down, according to Jefferson County Medical Examiner Selly Rivers, as evidenced by various sizes of bite wounds found on her body. The examiner found that the victim bled to death.

Fatal hog attacks are rare, with only four known deadly attacks in the U.S. in history. But that number is expected to grow as the wild boar population continues to explode across the South and as they expand their territory northward.

Neighbors told ABC13 they have been reporting problems with packs of hogs.

None of the neighbors reported hearing anything that morning, to include the resident patients of Rollins who she had been caring for, for about 18 months. The 84-year-old homeowner and his 79-year-old wife have severe dementia and Alzheimers and both require around-the-clock care.

Watch the station’s report that includes an interview with a local long-time boar hunter …


Video by ABC13

Family members said that Rollins, who would have turned 60 years old on Christmas Day, dedicated her life to helping people. Her survivors include an adult daughter and two grandchildren.

Watch this trailer for the series “American Hoggers” that provides a sense of the potentially violent nature of feral hogs …


Video by A&E

Mature feral hogs can weigh between 100 and 400 pounds, according to Texas Parks and Wildlife. (TPWD). It is believed that early Spanish explorers first introduced hogs to Texas more than 300 years ago.

“Hogs have four continuously growing tusks (two on top, two on bottom) and their contact causes a continuous sharpening of the lower tusks. They have relatively poor eyesight but have keen senses of hearing and smell,” according to TPWD. The department estimates a population of more than 1.5 million feral hogs in the state with that number growing by an average of 20% per year due to being prolific breeders.

Feral hogs are omnivorous, eating both plant and animal matter and they feed mostly at night or at twilight.

According to Texas A&M Agrilife, “They have extremely strong jaws to crack open hard-shelled nuts such as hickory nuts and pecans. As they predate upon or scavenge animal carcasses, they can easily break bones and often consume the entire carcass, often leaving little if any sign behind.”

TPWD’s literature on feral hogs claims that they are not generally considered dangerous, though they may need to revisit that. “All wild animals have the potential of being dangerous, especially when wounded or cornered,” the department’s pamphlet points out. “In a natural state, feral hogs will prefer to run and escape danger, and are not considered dangerous.”

On the other hand, TPWD admits: “Extreme caution should be maintained when tracking wounded animals, trapping animals or encountering females with young. Their razor sharp tusks combined with their lightning speed can cause serious injury.”

Famed MMA fighter, TV personality, and former Army Ranger and sniper Tim Kennedy is now on a mission …

Victor Rantala

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