It’s official: Bloomberg 2020 ad promises a perfect utopia if you pick him for president

Two weeks after filing to run in Alabama’s Democratic presidential primary, which has an early date of March 2020, former New York City Mayor Micheal Bloomberg officially announced his entrance into the race.

The Republican turned Independent turned Democrat has a big problem right out of the gate in today’s Democrat Party — that being that the progressive left doesn’t much like billionaires.

Which may explain the angle of an ad Bloomberg ran on Saturday night in Tallahassee, Fla., according to ABC News.

In the spot, he is billed as a “middle class kid who had to work his way through college” before making good.

Bloomberg touts his tenor as mayor of New York City following 9/11, “a three-term mayor who brought a city back from the ashes,” and his effort to drive the gun control movement in America, not to mention the prerequisite embrace of climate change in the ad.

Check out the ad below:

The spot says Bloomberg will take on “him,” as an image of President Donald Trump is displayed. It also shows an image of Trump Tower while talking about taxing the wealthy.

“And now, he’s taking on him (Trump) — to rebuild the country and restore faith in the dream that defines us where the wealthy will pay more in taxes, and the middle-class get their fair share,” the ad states.

Talking about “a different kind of menace coming from Washington,” the ad says, “there’s an America waiting to be rebuilt.”

It promises health care for all — are we to assume illegal immigrants? — and mimics Obama, promising that “everyone who likes theirs can go ahead and keep it.”

In effect, Bloomberg is essentially in lockstep with the basics that every Democratic candidate offers.

“Jobs creator, leader, problem-solver. Mike Bloomberg for president,” the ad concludes.

Bloomberg, 77, declared in March that he was too old and would not run, but he has now backtracked on that statement. The former mayor received only 4 percent support in recent polls and he’s viewed negatively by the majority of Democrat voters.

“To start a four-year job, or maybe an eight-year job, at age 77 may not be the smartest thing to do,” he said at the time.

Taking a page out Trump’s early playbook, Bloomberg said in a release that he will fund his campaign entirely on his own.

Amid a booming Trump economy, he plays the Trump Derangement Syndrome card.

“We cannot afford four more years of President Trump’s reckless and unethical actions,” he said in the statement. “He represents an existential threat to our country and our values. If he wins another term in office, we may never recover from the damage.”

Part of a massive $37 million ad buy, the new spot will run in multiple states across the country, including California, New York, Florida, Texas, and Illinois, ABC News reported. The ads will run on Sunday in some markets, and on Monday in the others.

The buy is touted by CMAG senior analyst Mitchell West as “undoubtedly the single biggest ad buy in history” in a primary contest — more than half of the $50 million the entire Democratic field spent on television so far this year, according to the ad agency’s data.

All the spending adds to concerns hard-left Democrats like Sen. Bernie Sanders have about Bloomberg.

“I’m disgusted by the idea that Michael Bloomberg or any other billionaire thinks they can circumvent the political process and spend tens of millions of dollars to buy our elections. It’s just the latest example of a rigged political system that we are going to change when we’re in the White House,” Sanders said in a statement.

Regardless of political stripe, Bloomberg’s entry doesn’t appear to excite folks much on social media — here’s a sampling of responses from Twitter:

Tom Tillison

Senior Staff Writer
[email protected]

The longest-tenured writer at BizPac Review, Tom grew up in Maryland before moving to Central Florida as a young teen. It is in the Sunshine State that he honed both his passion for politics and his writing skills.
Tom Tillison

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